Multiple Opportunities – Friction Manufacturer

first_imgLSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  Growing North American friction manufacturer is looking for personnel at all levels in order to accommodate growth and fill positions left by retirement. Positions available in all areas:   Plant Manager Supervisors Foreman CNC Operator Maintenance Supervisor   Compensation will be based on position and qualifications.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Click the Apply Now button below to submit your resume directly to the employer.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

Bear Spotted Eating Cherries On Camino Cereza Today

first_imgA bear is spotted today coincidently eating cherries on Camino Cereza. Photo by Andrew Phelpslast_img

Nomura sets high water mark in City

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Knight Frank and DTZ appointed to Leeds industrial estate

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

PGS Begins Seismic Shoot for Chariot Off Namibia

first_imgChariot Oil & Gas, in conjunction with its partners AziNam (20%), NAMCOR (10%) and Ignitus (5%), has started a 3D seismic acquisition of approximately 2,600 square km in Blocks 2312 & 2412A (Central Blocks) offshore Namibia.The survey is being conducted by PGS Exploration (UK) Limited and will fulfil the work commitment for the Central Blocks.Following the analysis of the 2D survey of approximately 1,700 line km, acquired on the north western flank of the licence in 2015, Chariot has identified several additional leads within the Upper Cretaceous deep water clastic turbidite system.The 3D survey will enable Chariot and its partners to mature these new leads and further develop its inventory in this region, which it believes to contain giant prospectivity, the company said in a press release.The survey is expected to take approximately 40 days.last_img read more

Who’s suing whom

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Collapsing construction workloads push plant hire prices down to nine-year low

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

Construction contracts: Global branding

first_imgOne can look at globalization as an inherently bad thing. The argument for this is often made by citing the example of city centres around the world and how they are all beginning to look the same, adorned by signs advertising global brands. The complaint is that it is becoming much harder to find a quirky coffee shop or a boutique hotel bursting with character, and such outlets are being driven out of business. My own experience is that, while there are fine examples of each, there are countless others that really do not fit the bill and this only becomes apparent after you have paid.What has this to do with the construction industry in the UK and globally? To start with, it is worth mentioning that UK construction has a great brand internationally, as does English law, and both are as recognisable as the iconic brands we tend to associate with globalization. While most people will think of construction itself as an export, what about construction contracts – is there an innovative opportunity here?Before getting carried away with this, it is important to consider what clients and customers want from contracts. Of course, there may be some who want quirky and boutique but the reality is that, when dealing with business as usual transactions, clients want consistency wherever they do business. This is particularly the case for large corporations that have a footprint across the globe. They actually find it difficult to accept that each country has a bespoke way of approaching construction contracts that cannot be changed. On the other hand, construction industries around the world have worked, in some cases for nearly a century, on the basis of national contracts. The JCT has had its 80th birthday and the New Engineering Contract has already clocked up two decades.Keeping language simple and concise has many benefits, not least of which is that contracts may need translation and the cost of doing that is directly related to the length of the legal draftingIs it possible to blend together the national and international? Let’s consider the road blocks. Most of us like to stay in our comfort zone – in a curious way, that same feeling of comfort is why we are both reassured by seeing a global brand in another country but resistant to putting down our local brand at home.Much can be said about how different forms of construction contract are so fundamentally different, that they simply will not be understood or accepted in different markets. I have never bought into this theory – I have yet to encounter a construction contract anywhere that does not deal with time, price and quality. The concepts of liability caps, indemnities and copyright are universally recognised and there is pretty much an international market position for each of them. While the legal systems of different countries may lead them to operate differently from country to country, it is not often that a given concept cannot be implemented to some degree in a particular country. Take the idea of a limitation period – we’re used to seeing 12 years in the UK where contracts are executed as deeds. In some countries the limitation period has to be more than 12 years, in others it cannot be. however, I am not aware of any country that does not allow a limitation period to operate at all.In practically every country, the convention of construction contract drafting is to start from a published set of general conditions that are then changed by a set of amendments (or particular conditions). What tends to happen at this point is that the amendments attempt to turn the underlying contract into something else – usually to make it the same as the form of contract with which the drafter is most used to dealing.However, it is possible to take a different path at this point and adapt the contract to meet the client’s requirements, rather than using legal drafting to create a comfort zone. What does this mean in practice? Clear language is key as, while many global contracts will be drafted, negotiated and executed in English, English may well be the second language of one or both sides to the contract. Never has it been more important for contract drafters to steer clear of legalese and avoid the temptation to add words at the expense of communicating clearly. My favourite example of this has long been using “in the event that” when “if” does exactly the same job.Keeping language simple and concise has many other benefits, not least of which is that contracts may need translation (for legal or commercial reasons) and the cost of doing that is directly related to the length of the legal drafting.As far as I’m concerned, we all benefit from keeping it simple.Michael Conroy Harris is a construction specialist at Evershedslast_img read more

Westgarth joins Seagull board

first_imgWestgarth is current chairman of Intertanko – the International Association of Independent Tank Owners – and former president of floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) operator, Teekay. www.seagull.nowww.intertanko.comlast_img

Georgia sees tonnage climb

first_imgThe Port of Brunswick’s dedicated auto and machinery terminal moved 674,327 units in FY14, while Savannah’s Ocean Terminal added another 26,375 for a record total of 700,702 units. GPA’s ro-ro cargo improved by 63,760 units or ten percent on the year, while breakbulk cargo saw a gain of 5.2 percent in FY14, growing by 129,861 tonnes to reach 2.63 million tonnes. The added volume contributed to a record year in total tonnage, claimed GPA.www.gaports.comlast_img