Premium sky-high living is looking up in the capital

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Five decades on and the world of property hasn’t changed much

first_imgSome of the stories we were covering in 1972 could, with a slight twist, have been written this week. Nine Elms had become interesting because of the move of Covent Garden Market south of the river; today it is the move of the US embassy that is making headlines (and will probably provide the occasion for a president Trump visit now that completion is nearing).The future of the area around Piccadilly Circus was under review, with three big property beasts battling it out; today things have partly been resolved by The Crown Estate renaming Lower Regent Street ‘Regent Street St James’s’. We can only hope that Haymarket doesn’t get similarly homogenised.Housing was a big issue at the time. Developers were seen as the chief cause of the shortage on account of their interest in office development. Harry Hyams was the man the intelligentsia loved to hate, because his development Centre Point remained empty for years, thus becoming an example of property as a trading commodity rather than a provider of social use. It was squatted for a weekend; I wonder if those involved thought the tower (courtesy of Mike Hussey) would be converted into apartments…Housing was a big issue in 1972. Developers were seen as the chief cause of the shortageCompared with today, the 1970s housing ‘shortage’ was a near miracle of supply and demand balance, although then – as now – if you were homeless that was of little comfort. Housing campaign group Shelter was in its first flush, and one can only wonder at how an organisation that has proved so unsuccessful manages to survive.As is sometimes the case in British public life, nothing succeeds like failure: the proposition is that without Shelter, things could have been even worse. Discuss.Bizarre initiativesNow the past seems more like another planet than another country. It is hard now to understand what prompted the madness of ‘office development permits’ and ‘industrial development certificates’, which were the property world’s equivalent of post-war butter ration coupons.Whitehall knew best; the high point of government attempts to ‘control’ the property market came when Anthony Crosland (the public school/Oxford University socialist who hated grammar schools) introduced the Community Land Act in 1975.This proposition lasted about five minutes, but it was a good example of how governments of all persuasions generally misunderstood the property market, thinking that the way to deal with it was by ever-increasing control, red tape and financial penalty.In respect of the office market, this also meant bizarre initiatives such as the publicly funded Location of Offices Bureau, whose role was to try to persuade employers to move their offices out of London because it was so horrible. (Younger readers please note: I am not making this up!)Source: Shutterstock/Paul D SmithEventually, the political establishment realised that the office market was providing the factories of today and decided to leave it alone.The consequence has been a broad balance of supply and demand across many decades; a vacancy rate generally somewhere between 7% and 12%; and in anything other than the very short term, a situation in which tenants have some choice while suppliers need to think about the quality of what they are providing. This has improved both product and choice, as the BCO Awards amply demonstrate.At the BCO dinner, I briefly suggested that those responsible for the housing market might learn something from their commercial peers, but I should have added that it is mostly the political class that needs to review the past 50 years if it wants to understand why housing supply has fallen far too short. Offices and shopping have not, even if for a long period the quality of design left much to be desired. The quantum was OK.This is why the prime minister’s speech at the Conservative Party annual conference was interesting: since when did any PM pledge £2bn to a housing strategy based on proactive policies of a sort not seen in either Tory or Labour policies since the 1960s? Who cares if she had a cough?The question now, for her as it is for London mayor Sadiq Khan, is whether financial commitment and stirring speeches can translate into actual delivery of homes on the ground. I wish I could say I was holding my breath.Paul Finch is programme director of the World Architecture Festivallast_img read more

Countrywide to close branches as sales halve.

first_imgHarry Hill, chairman said that completed sales in the first half of November were running at about half the rate seen in the summer.’There is still a reasonable number of people wanting to buy a house but the net situation is being affected by a high cancellation rate,’ he said. Cancellations were greater than in the last “mini-slowdown” in late 2004 and 2005, he added.’Mr Average is just seeing this maelstrom of news going around his head, most of which isn’t very good,” he said. “Even if he goes to buy a house, he goes to the pub and half his mates say he must be mental. So he rings up and changes his mind.’Countrywide employs more than 10,000 people and owns brands such as John D Wood, Bairstow Eve, Abbotts, Gascoigne Pees and the Bradford & Bingley estate agencies.last_img read more

Prime Minister Minnis announces partial re-opening of certain businesses and…

first_img “Our plan is to gradually begin to re-open the economy based on the data collected by health officials and their professional advice,” said Prime Minister Minnis.“But the pace of the re-opening of the economy will also depend on the cooperation and discipline of the public in following the health guidelines.” Family Island hardware, lumber, plumbing and electrical stores that cater to construction will be allowed to open Monday to Friday 7am to 5pm. However, Family Island borders remain closed to international and to domestic air and marine transport from other islands. Oct 16, 2020 Oct 16, 2020 CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak Prime Minister Minnis also announced that individuals must travel with valid ID when out in public. He emphasized that the police would continue to enforce the curfew and anyone violating the Emergency Powers (COVID-19) Order could face a fine or stricter penalty. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Starting early this week, health officials will expand sampling using current RT-PCR capacity. Those targeted for testing will include contacts of confirmed cases, especially those with symptoms; healthcare personnel nearing the end of their quarantine period; nursing and homecare personnel; and individuals calling into the hotline reporting concerning symptoms, said the Prime Minister. This will be done utilizing physicians, nurses and medical technologists to go out into the community. Prime Minister the Most Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis announced the partial re-opening of home and hardware stores, auto parts establishments and plant nurseries, and the resumption of construction in the Family Islands during a press conference to update the nation on the national response to COVID-19, on Sunday 19 April. Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC “Our main priority at all times must be to save and to protect lives,” said Prime Minister Minnis. Landscaping and property maintenance services will also be allowed to operate during the 24-hour curfew, Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm. You may be interested in… The Government is trying to balance the essential and necessary health measures to fight COVID-19 with what can be done to carefully re-open some areas of the economy, said the Prime Minister. Oct 15, 2020 More deaths from COVID-19 recorded in CARICOM countries,… St. Lucia records more cases of COVID Oct 15, 2020 The Bahamas Government outlines new measures to curb COVID spread including curfewStory via CMC – The Bahamas government Wednesday announced a series of new measures aimed at curbing the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) in two islands, including a 24 hour weekend curfew, a doubling of the fines for breaching the protocols, even as it maintained that the international airport will…October 8, 2020In “General”PM announces ‘total lockdown’ of Bahamas after COVID spikePrime Minister Dr Hubert Minnis Monday night announced a “complete national lockdown” of every island in The Bahamas for at least the next two weeks after the country recorded a significant spike in the number of cases of the coronavirus (COVID-19). In a nationwide radio and television broadcast, Minnis said…August 4, 2020In “General”The Bahamas uniquely positioned to become jurisdiction of choice for Blockchain companies – PM MinnisPrime Minister, Dr. the Hon. Hubert Minnis says Grand Bahama is the ideal location in The Bahamas to support the establishment and growth of a technology cluster of the blockchain, and other software companies that can jumpstart the technology industry in The Bahamas. In spite of the challenges that come…June 22, 2018In “Business”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

Doug Schlueter Of I-CAR Named To National Auto Body Council Board Of Directors

first_imgLSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  Doug Schlueter, national MSO manager at I-CAR, is the newest elected member of the National Auto Body Council (NABC) board of directors.  AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementNABC is a not-for-profit organization committed to the goal of improving the image of all dedicated collision industry professionals, while ensuring the industry is recognized as essential in serving the community.Schlueter has been at I-CAR for seven years. He started as the South central regional manager then moved into the national MSO manager role six years ago. Schlueter has more than 25 years of experience in the industry and has held sales and management leadership positions with Enterprise, Hertz, Insurance Auto Auctions and Copart. He holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of North Texas and lives in Overland Park, Kansas.Nick Notte, I-CAR director of business development, is a past-chairman of NABC and serves on the executive committee. Brandon Eckenrode, director of development of the Collision Repair Education Foundation, also serves on the NABC board of directors.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

Australia launches Gas Vision 2050

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North American CO2 Summit: session three recap

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

Talking lizards

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Rock-It invests in Triple M

first_imgRock-It Cargo is a specialist in oversized and difficult shipments for international music tours, film productions, tradeshows and international arts exhibitions. Paul J. Martins, president of the company, said: “Rock-it’s increased investment derives from the natural evolution of the relationship of the two businesses.“The continued partnership between Triple M and Rock-it will provide best-in-class service to their joint customers. Triple M are well positioned geographically to assist us with all the logistics needs of our live touring customers, sports customers, industrial product customers and other end vertical markets we serve,” he added.Located in Antwerp, Triple M is both close to the seaport and connected to an inland jetty allowing containers to be trucked or barged to their cross-load site with the capacity to handle up to 15 containers or trucks simultaneously.With regard to airfreight, Rock-It said that Triple M utilises Brussels and Liege airports in Belgium, and Schiphol and Maastricht in the Netherlands, as well as Luxembourg airport, giving shippers a selection of carriers and routes into and out of Northern Europe.www.triplem.bewww.rockitcargo.comlast_img read more

Quotas ‘demeaning’ to women and minority groups – Leveson

first_imgThe president of the Queen’s Bench Division has branded quotas as ‘demeaning’ to women and minority ethnic groups. Sir Brian Leveson (pictured) waded into the controversial debate over quotas ahead of the publication of a government-backed report that could put law firms under new pressure to promote women in senior posts.Giving a lecture in the Isle of Man entitled ‘Justice for the 21st century’, Leveson said quotas were the ‘antithesis of appointment on merit and demeaning whether to women or those from minority ethnic groups’.‘Making allowance for career breaks or for the consequences of caring responsibilities is one thing,’ Leveson said. ‘That is entirely justifiable because the assessment of merit necessarily embraces potential.’But creating a ‘principle of appointment’ to achieve gender or ethnic balance ‘will inevitably lead to the inference that those appointments are most decidedly not based on merit alone’, Leveson said.The judiciary, he added, were taking steps to improve diversity. These include establishing schemes to widen entry into the High Court, and through outreach, mentoring, judicial work-shadowing and flexible working patterns.‘It is work in progress,’ Leveson said. ‘It is an important one that we all as judges, lawyers and members of society have a stake in realising.’Later this month the Davies Review, which was originally set up to increase the number of women on boards, is due to publish a report which will recommend women make at least a quarter of posts at FTSE 100 companies.The profession is currently split on whether quotas should be introduced to tackle the lack of diversity higher up the career ladder.Last month Vodafone group general counsel Rosemary Martin said quotas were ‘deeply offensive’ but ‘absolutely essential’. However employment lawyer Dame Janet Gaymer said she was not persuaded of the merits of quotas.Research conducted by the Law Society’s Women Lawyers Division during an International Women’s Day Conference in 2012 showed that younger delegates favoured quotas but ‘more established’ women did not, a spokesperson said.However, both agreed that an ‘expedient’ solution was required to address the gender pay gap, and representation in the boardroom and on the bench.‘We welcome any constructive response that encourages parity and inclusion, which could never be an insult to those women who lack only the opportunity, not talent, for senior appointments,’ the spokesperson said.last_img read more