Saint Mary’s juniors welcome their mothers to campus

first_imgSaint Mary’s juniors gave their moms a glimpse into their college lives during this past weekend with the college’s annual Junior Moms Weekend. The weekend began Friday with a reception, where juniors and their moms received a t-shirt with the slogan “I got it from my momma.”Later that night, moms and daughters participated in karaoke night at O’Rourke’s Public House on Eddy Street, junior Meredith Mackowicz said. “Karaoke is always fun, and this weekend was no exception, even though it was packed everyone had a great time,” Mackowicz said.For junior Brianna Foley, her favorite part of the weekend was karaoke.“It was a fun and relaxed time with our moms. Moms and daughters were able to mingle with each other and sing to some good songs,” Foley said.The next day, juniors and their moms could shop and browse clothing at a trunk show, which included brands such as Beyond Zen, Gina Marie Skincare and Vintage Charm, class council representative senior Delaney Gilbert said. Gilbert helped plan the weekend.Mackowicz said introducing her mom to her friends at school was a unique opportunity.“When I was in high school, all of my friends’ families knew each other, and were able to connect and form friendships with one another, and I think parents weekends are a great way to do that,” she said. ”Plus, with [Saint Mary’s] being an all women’s college, it’s important to show love to the strong women who raised us, because we wouldn’t be who we are without them.”Saturday also included a mass and dinner at the Hilton Garden Inn, which concluded the weekend.“I wish it went through Sunday, just because I’m always up for more time with my mom. But, for the price we pay, I think a final Sunday brunch with the moms would be awesome, even if it was just DH,” Mackowicz said. Mackowicz said attending mass with her mom was a good opportunity to bond and reflect.“It was just a really special experience. It was nice to take a little break and be thankful for such a good weekend together,” she said.Foley said she enjoyed letting her mom peek into her life as a college student. “I think it is a good time for moms to come to see their children at school, the school to appreciate students’ parents and a good time for parents to meet other students’ parents,” she said. “My mom really was able to see what it was like to be a Belle this weekend.”Tags: Junior Moms Weekend, parents, saint mary’slast_img read more

Tickets On Sale for Off-Broadway’s Every Day A Visitor

first_imgTickets are now available for Richard Abrons’ comedy Every Day A Visitor, which will begin performances November 2 at The Clurman Theater at Theater Row and play through December 14. Opening night is set for November 14. The show is set in a Jewish home for the aged in the Bronx. The residents are cranky, argumentative about their surroundings and each other. To change their perspective and respect for each other, they each play-act somebody famous. This leads to a renewed vitality, imaginative relationships and plain old-fashioned fun. Every Day A Visitor will have scenic design by David L Arsenault, lighting design by Travis McHale, costume design by Gail Cooper-Hecht, and sound design by Mark Bruckner. Margarett Perry directs a cast that includes Bern Cohen, Irma-Estel Laguerre, George Morfogen, Henry Packer, Joan Porter, Evan Thompson, Raphael Nash Thompson, Teddy Coluca and Janet Sarno. View Commentslast_img read more

28th Maintenance Group

first_imgThe 28th Maintenance Group is responsible for generating airpower for the 28th Bomb Wing. The group maintains fleet health and availability of 27 combat-coded B-1B Lancers, associated support equipment and munitions, supporting annual flying and training programs, as well as Joint Chiefs of Staff and contingency taskings. The group leads and manages the production of a 1,500-member workforce comprised of three squadrons and one flight with annual organizational maintenance and reparable support division budgets exceeding $91.5 million, aircraft and weapons valued at more than $8.9 billion and real property worth $332.5 million.28TH AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE SQUADRONThe 28th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron is the largest squadron in the 28th Bomb Wing with more than 700 Airmen and contractors who maintain and support 27 B-1s. The 34th and 37th Aircraft Maintenance Units provide direct maintenance support to the 34th and 37th Bomb Squadrons at home and deployed, with maintenance equipment support from the Support Flight. The squadron performs all on-equipment maintenance, weapons loading and support activities, generating combat and flying training sorties for B-1 aircrews at home and around the world.28TH MAINTENANCE SQUADRONThe 28th Maintenance Squadron combines avionics, aircraft systems and equipment maintenance, fabrication and non-destructive inspection capabilities into one squadron consisting of seven flights with more than 460 assigned personnel. The squadron has contract oversight of Precision Measurement Equipment Laboratories and Transient Alert activities and is responsible for all off-equipment maintenance and heavy repairs, supporting 27 combat-coded B-1s and related subsystems. The 28th MXS also manages the base’s Crashed, Damaged, Disabled Aircraft Repair program, which is responsible for a five-state area of operations. Finally, the squadron maintains approximately 660 pieces of aerospace ground equipment, as well as spare aircraft engines and engine test cell operations to support Joint Chiefs of Staff operational taskings.28TH MUNITIONS SQUADRONThe 28th Munitions Squadron provides conventional munitions, armament systems and trained munitions personnel, supporting 27 B-1s assigned to the 28th Bomb Wing. The squadron consists of more than 250 professionals working in four flights supporting the 34th and 37th Bomb Squadrons and one National Guard unit. The squadron is responsible for 1,629 munitions line items worth $259 million, 630,662 pounds net explosive weight, 89 facilities and a 647-acre munitions storage area.last_img read more

Hobby Lobby plans new store in Merriam; future of Mission location in doubt

first_imgA rendering of the new Hobby Lobby store submitted to Merriam.Mission will be gaining one big sales tax generator when Walmart moves from Roeland Park to the Gateway project, but it appears it could be losing another one as Hobby Lobby makes plans for a new store in Merriam.Register to continuelast_img

Don’t Underestimate The Impact (And Business Value) Of A Simple “Thank You” Note

first_imgWriting a thank you note is such a simple and easy gesture, we may actually undervalue its power, especially in the business world. A study published last year in the journal Psychological Science finds that there are several ways in which we underestimate the impact of saying thank you. First, we miscalculate how grateful the recipient is likely to be. Participants were asked to guess, on a scale of one to five, how happy someone will be to receive such a note. While senders typically guessed a three, recipients usually rated their response at a four or five. Read the whole story: Forbeslast_img read more

Returning travelers cause sizable malaria burden in US

first_imgOver a recent 15-year period, close to 1,500 US travelers a year were hospitalized for treatment of malaria acquired overseas, far more than were treated for other travel-related diseases, according to a study published yesterday on the eve of World Malaria Day.In related news, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced yesterday that a pilot program for administering the world’s first malaria vaccine to young children will be conducted in Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi starting next year.Imported cases cost $555 millionMalaria transmission in the United States was stopped in the 1950s, but a steady stream of travelers are bringing the disease home with them, suggesting that many travelers are not taking adequate precautions, according to the study published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (AJTMH).Researchers looked for malaria cases in hospitalization discharge records in the 2000 to 2014 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, according to the report. They estimated there were 22,029 malaria-related hospitalizations over the 15 years, or 4.88 per million population, with 4,823 severe cases and 182 in-hospital deaths.”It appears more and more Americans are traveling to areas where malaria is common and many of them are not taking preventive measures, such as using anti-malarial preventive medications and mosquito repellents, even though they are very effective at preventing infections,” Diana Khuu, PhD, MPH, lead author of the study, said in an AJTMH news release. She is a scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles.The findings showed that malaria-linked hospitalizations, averaging 1,489 per year, were far more common than hospitalizations for most other travel-related diseases, according to the release. For example, dengue fever, which is common in Latin America, accounted for 259 hospitalizations per year over the same period.The malaria patients were hospitalized for an average of 4.36 days, at an average cost of $25,789, the report said. The total cost of the cases over the 15 years came to about $555 million.The burden fell disproportionately on patients who were male, black, or 25 to 44 years old, the study found. Plasmodium falciparum malaria—the most deadly type—accounted for most of the hospitalizations, and August was the month with the most cases.Since about 69% of all malaria patients need hospital treatment, the scientists estimated that about 2,100 people in the United States have malaria each year, according to the release.Khuu commented that mosquitoes capable of carrying malaria are common in parts of the United States, and that increases in the number of travelers coming home with the disease increase the risk of re-establishing the disease in the country. But the study found no significant change in the rate of malaria hospitalizations over the study period.Malaria vaccinations planned in AfricaMeanwhile, plans to give the new malaria vaccine, called RTS,S, to children in parts of Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi were announced yesterday by the WHO’s Regional Office for Africa. The vaccine was developed to protect young children from P falciparum malaria.The pilot program will assess whether the vaccine’s protective effect in children 5 to 17 months old, shown in phase 3 testing, can be replicated in real life, the WHO said. Specifically, the program will test the feasibility of delivering the required four doses of RTS,S, the vaccine’s potential role in reducing childhood deaths, and its safety in routine use.WHO officials describe the vaccine as a complementary tool that could be added to the core package of WHO-recommended measures for preventing malaria, including insecticide-treated bed nets, spraying indoor walls with insecticides, and preventive medicines for pregnant women and young children.Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi were chosen for the program because they have high coverage with treated bed nets, good malaria and immunization programs, high malaria burdens, and participation in the RTS,S phase 3 trials, the WHO said.RTS,S was developed by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and is the first malaria vaccine to succeed in a phase 3 trial, the WHO noted. In 2015, two WHO advisory groups recommended pilot vaccination programs in three to five settings in sub-Saharan Africa.Several non-governmental global health agencies are partnering to provide $49.2 million for the first phase of the pilot program (2017 to 2020), which will be complemented by in-kind contributions from the WHO and GSK, the WHO said.WHO cites progress, challengesIn other malaria news, the WHO yesterday reported progress and big remaining challenges in the battle against the disease. The agency said the rate of new malaria cases fell by 21% globally from 2010 to 2015, and death rates fell by 29% in the same 5-year period. In sub-Saharan Africa, which bears 90% of the malaria burden, cases and death rates fell by 21% and 31%, respectively.Still, in 2015 the global malaria toll was 429,000 deaths and 212 million new cases, with one child dying from malaria every 2 minutes, the WHO said.The agency’s long-term malaria strategy calls for reducing cases and deaths by 90% and eliminating the disease in at least 35 countries by 2030. Interim 2020 targets call for 40% reductions in cases and death rates and for eliminating malaria in at least 10 countries.Funds for malaria prevention, researchOther malaria news related to World Malaria Day included announcements about grants for malaria prevention and research:The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria said today it would provide more than $242 million over 3 years to continue the battle against malaria in Cambodia, Thailand, Myanmar, Laos, and Vietnam. The grant will be the group’s largest regional allocation and the first with the specific goal of eliminating the disease in a specific region. The step continues the fund’s Regional Artemisinin-resistance Initiative, launched in 2013.The US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) announced late last week it would provide about $9 million in first-year funding for seven malaria research centers around the world. The awards will go to three new and four existing centers that work in 14 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The 7-year awards continue NIAID’s 2010 program that created the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) in regions where malaria is endemic.See also:Arp 24 AJTMH abstractApr 24 AJTMH press releaseApr 24 WHO-Africa press release on vaccination programApr 24, 2015, CIDRAP News story “First malaria vaccine shows promise despite efficacy drop-off”Oct 23, 2015, CIDRAP News story “WHO experts urge gradual rollout of malaria vaccine”Apr 24 WHO press release on malaria progress and challengeslast_img read more

Stephen Vernon in €900m tie up with US private equity group

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Doctor Doctor Mister MD

first_imgI’m not big on going to the doctor. The way I figure it, doctors don’t make any money on healthy people. Put another way, there must be a little something wrong with everyone. My working philosophy is: If it don’t hurt, don’t worry about it.Most everyone I know who has died was seeing a doctor at the time. At these prices, I say just go straight from good health to death and cut out the middlemen.I watch “Jeopardy” every night on TV. There must be a lot of senior citizens who watch, because every commercial is pushing some kind of drug. Oftentimes, the potential side effects of the drug are much worse than whatever it is the pill is supposed to help.We all know the usual warnings. It used to be, “Do not operate heavy equipment.” I get that.“Mom, I’m going to take Judy out in the crane tonight.”“Not if you take that Viagra, mister!”Consider this minor little side effect: “rare cases of severe hepatic reactions, including jaundice and fatal hepatitis, liver necrosis and hepatic failure, some of them with fatal outcomes have been reported.”This is for Torodal, an anti-inflammatory pill that people with ulcers take. So, let’s break it down. One minute you have a stomach ache because you ate some pepperoni. Next minute? You’re dead. . . and yellow.Have a headache? Ibuprofen works, right? You can buy it anywhere, even 7-Eleven. But “if your tongue swells up and you have difficulty breathing, consult a physician.”Imagine THAT phone call:Me: Hawoo Derkter Tong Thwell (choking) . . .Doctor: “Do you have health insurance? We’ll need you to read the information on the back of your card to us.”Ambien poses an interesting risk: Some people who have taken it have performed certain activities while they were not fully awake. These have included sleep driving, making and eating food, and having sex.Who knew?We’ve all seen this one: “If you experience a prolonged, painful erection, stop using this medicine and seek immediate medical attention or permanent problems could occur.”So, you go to the doctor and he says, “I don’t see any evidence of this occurring.” Now, that hurts.It’s not just medicines that have bizarre warnings. For example, “Warning: has been found to cause cancer in laboratory mice” is written on a box of rat poison, I kid you not. Hey, we’re not animals — we don’t want to give them tumors; we just want to kill them.“Warning: do not use if you have urination problems” — this is a tough one, because I personally urinate each and every day. Is this a problem?It’s written on a box of Midol PMS relief pills. (Alert readers will note women suffer from PMS 23 days each month, have their periods for six days and are completely normal for two days — except in September, April, June, and November. It should be noted women should be avoided at all costs on Feb. 29 unless you are carrying a crucifix.)Not to belittle doctors, but all parents know that when our little ones were growing up, we took them to the doctor way too often, some of us every time they had a sniffle or a sneeze. This is the meat-and-potatoes of the industry — every time we walked into the office, the cash register sounded, and since our health care provider got the bills, we never knew how costly each little check-up could be. Then, after a battery of tests, which 99 percent of the time were unnecessary, we’d get prescriptions to fill, not realizing the pills were probably worse for your kid than whatever ailed him or her.I don’t take pills. I never did. Even when I was a kid and the doctor gave me something and the directions said, “take three a day with meals” I would carefully throw one out with breakfast, one right before lunch, and one after dinner. Guess what? I didn’t die.I told my mom I intended to live my life like a Native American warrior. She’d counter with the fact that the average life expectancy of a Native American Indian Brave was 31. Maybe so, but the cool ones like Crazy Horse rode around with loincloths on and nothing else. Except maybe a peace pipe. Sharelast_img read more

Vattenfall Seeking Supervisor for Sandbank Substation Work

first_imgVattenfall is inviting tenders for work on the Sandbank offshore wind farm substation construction.The contractor will be in charge of supervising the steelwork fabrication and corrosion protection of an offshore wind farm substation.The 288MW project is located in the German Bight area, around 90 kilometers west of the Island of Sylt.The wind farm, owned by Vattenfall 51% and Stadtwerke München 49%, is comprised of 72 Siemens 4 MW wind turbines.According to the developer, the construction of Sandbank is expected to commence next year. Offshore WIND staff, July 30, 2014; Image: sandbank24last_img read more

ROLAND Spedition moves railtrack machinery

first_imgOverall ROLAND Spedition handled the movement of 12 machines with an approximate total weight of 500 tonnes, transferring the machines directly from the rail line in the port of Drammen, Norway to a geared heavy lift vessel. On arrival in Bremen, the machines were again transferred directly onto the rail line. ROLAND Spedition staff were on hand in both countries during the most challenging parts of the operation to provide close supervision.last_img