New study finds evidence that political ambition can be genetically inherited from one’s parent

first_imgShare Share on Facebook LinkedIn “A second reason why it is important to be better able to explain political behavior is of a more normative nature. It is often asserted that the essence of politics is power and power relationships. From this point of view, it is important to understand what explains why some citizens are more politically active than others. Put differently, a better understanding of the reasons for political participation is a precondition for creating a more equal society,” Oskarsson said.Statistics Sweden, a government agency, maintains a database called the Multi-Generation Register that contains information on the biological parents of individuals. The database includes 10,717,814 non-adopted individuals and 155,865 adopted individuals.The researchers analyzed this data, along with additional information regarding educational attainment, income, occupational status and political candidacy, to examine the intergenerational transmission of political behavior. Overall, the probability of being a political candidate was about 2.3%. But among adopted individuals whose biological parents were candidates, the probability of being a political candidate jumped up to about 5%.“A first take-home point is that there is a strong parent–child transmission in the tendency to run for office. If you have a parent that ran for office, there is a much higher likelihood that you will also stand as a political candidate as an adult,” Oskarsson told PsyPost.“Second, and more importantly, this intergenerational transmission in political candidacy status reflects both social and genetic factors. We used a sample of adopted children and their biological and adoptive parents to investigate this.”“The results clearly suggest that having a biological parent who ran for office is a good predictor of the adoptee’s probability of running for office as adults, despite the fact that these children were adopted away early in life and have had no contact with their birth parents ever since. However, the results also indicate that adoptive parents’ political activity is a major source of intergenerational resemblance,” Oskarsson said.All scientific research includes some limitations — and this study is no exception.“Like other recent studies on the heritability of complex human behaviors this study takes a first important step by showing that political candidacy is caused by both social and genetic factors. However, it is even more important to take further steps and investigate how social and political traits are shaped by the interplay between genes and environment,” Oskarsson explained.“They arise when the type or magnitude of the effect of a genetic factor depends on the environmental conditions in which it is expressed. In our case we can suspect, for example, that a predisposition toward political engagement may only matter under the right environmental circumstances. However, the knowledge of how these so called gene-by-environment interactions actually work is currently limited: what genetic factors interact with what social, economic and political factors, and how?”The findings indicate that political candidacy may be a genetically influenced trait. However, any genetic influence is just one factor among many that contribute to an individual’s decision to run for public office.“It is important to note that our results do not signal genetic determinism. Our finding that biological parents’ behavior is a strong predictor of political candidacy among adoptees does not mean that there is direct causal link between a set of genetic factors and an individual’s propensity to run for office. Any genetic effect on a complex behavior such as running for office will undoubtedly be mediated by a large set of factors, some of which are malleable,” Oskarsson added.“It is also important to stress that omitting the genetic part of intergenerational transmission – that is, failing to take into account that we are not only raised by our parents, but we also inherit a combination of their DNA – neglects an integral part of the explanation of social and political traits because genetic differences between individuals not only add to social and environmental influences but also co-vary and interact with them in complex ways.”“Consequently, considering genetic influences by no means negates social influences, but rather provides an additional layer of explanation that can substantially improve our understanding of how they work. As such, it can also aid in developing more effective policies that deal with the social roots and consequences of social and political inequality,” Oskarsson said.The study, “It Runs in the Family: A Study of Political Candidacy Among Swedish Adoptees“, was authored by Sven Oskarsson, Christopher T. Dawes, and Karl-Oskar Lindgren. A new study on Swedish adoptees suggests that political candidacy is a heritable trait. The research, which appears in the journal Political Behavior, found that the likelihood of standing as a political candidate doubled if one’s parent had been a candidate.“My research interest in general concerns how human behavior, especially political behavior, is formed by the interplay between social and genetic factors,” explained study author Sven Oskarsson of Uppsala University and the Uppsala Center for Labor Studies.“A better understanding of these basic causes of differences in political behavior is fundamental for at least two reasons. The first is that politics and political activity is something that in a deeper sense is a characteristic of us as a species. Humans are, to quote Aristotle, political animals by nature. This means that a deeper understanding of how we think and act in political contexts is an important part of our understanding of ourselves.”center_img Email Pinterest Share on Twitterlast_img read more

Ohio State women top No. 14 Iowa 91-85 in OT in Big 10

first_imgHOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill. (AP) — Kelsey Mitchell scored 29 points for the second night in a row, Alexa Hart added 24 and Ohio State topped No. 14 Iowa 91-85 in overtime to advance to the Big Ten Conference tournament final on Sunday.Ohio State (23-9) will face No. 4 Maryland (29-2), winners over No. 24 Northwestern in the other semifinal on Saturday.In overtime, Whitney Jennings made a pair of free throws with 42 seconds left to draw Iowa to within one point. But on the next possession, Mitchell nailed a 3-pointer with 14 seconds left to make it a four-point game.Jennings missed from the inside on the next trip down, and Mitchell made two free throws to seal it.After a tightly-contested second half, Hart hit 1 of 2 free throws to put Ohio State up by two with 17 seconds to go, but Bethany Doolittle’s layup with three seconds left forced overtime.The teams were tied at the half at 37.Melissa Dixon had 22 points and Doolittle finished with 21 for Iowa (24-7).last_img read more

EIG 2016: Amitabh Ghatak – Reality Bites…embracing new technology

first_img Related Articles Amitabh GhatakThe industry’s relationship with new technology and its impact on consumer trends and behaviour will be a key point of discussion at this week’s EIG 2016 Conference (Arena Berlin 18-20 October).Amitabh Ghatak former William Hill  Head of Product Development details to SBC how operators and industry stakeholders should assess and value new technologies entering the industry’s value chain.__________________________SBC: Hi Amitabh, you will be speaking at EIG Berlin on new technology impacts, Why should industry stakeholders be concerned by this subject matter?  Amitabh Ghatak: All industries across the world are either leveraging technology to gain a competitive edge or are worried about the next startup that could potentially disrupt an industry entirely.In gaming industry itself, you only have to look back to 2012 – the point at which mobile became the dominant emerging channel. It was such a seismic shift and companies that didn’t have a mobile-first approach got left behind fairly quickly.SBC: In your opinion are igaming and betting industry stakeholders good at embracing new technologies? What can be done to have a more innovative marketplace?  AG: We need to recognise that we are not tech companies – although some companies are making genuine efforts to be one. Till the time we have the desire and the tech platform to be “Innovators”, I don’t see anything wrong in being the “Early Majority.”That said, as a technology enthusiast, Im genuinely surprised by how little progress we’ve made on the gaming side. Are our slots particularly different from what they were in 70’s? Yes, the device has changed, but with such amazing (non-gambling) games coming to mobile devices, the current suite looks a little dated. Even if you look at the social casino world, they are quite ahead in terms of an “entertaining experience” compared to RMG.SBC: Assessing current consumer trends and habits, what technology do you feel will lead to the next industry ‘paradigm shift’?AG: Almost certainly VR/AR. You only have to look at Mark Zuckerberg’s Oculus Connect talk to understand where the future is. Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and others are pumping in money by the billions in order to nail this. Pokemon Go has paved the way for people to think of AR as a genuine revenue generating opportunity. Augmented Reality has always been one of those technologies that was looking for a purpose, and I think its finally come of age.SBC: With regards to new technology impacts, which outside industries should igaming and online betting stakeholder look to learn from?AG: There are several similarities between the world financial trading and sports betting (market makers vs book makers, trading, high transaction volumes, joy and pain of playing). Hedge funds now trade algorithmically in private pools with transaction times in milliseconds. They’ve even physically moved offices to be closer their data centres to save on transaction time. Of course this is a bit excessive (for now) but you can see how they maximise the use of tech.On the consumer side, the sports and gaming sites are modelled around an e-commerce experience (add-to-cart & checkout), although i think the large sites are still not very impressive – look to the niche e-commerce apps to get inspiration. l also see a blend of content and commerce becoming more relevant.SBC: As new technologies enter the market what industry legacy values do you feel will be tested or ultimately made redundant?AG: Retail is a steady ship but with a changing demographic, its getting harder to stay profitable. Certainly, there needs to be a pivot within retail towards a different profile – and that could be tech-driven, or could even be a partnership with another established chain.There’s also a greater set of options for the customer’s wallet, gaming is just one of the many. There would have to be a shift towards making the propositions more entertaining and intertwined with content as well as real-world (not just digital) opportunities to enhance the ride.SBC: Finally…what do you want EIG delegates to take away from your speaker session on new technology impacts?AG: One, there’s nothing wrong in being the “Early Majority.”, just be in a place to understand where the trends are outside the industry. Two, set yourself up for doing innovation, but always tie it to your core proposition – don’t try moonshots. and finally, partner with a company who specialises in the type of innovation you’re looking to experiment in. This is also not for the faint hearted, it requires time, effort and iterations._____________________Amitabh Ghatak Submit William Hill accelerates transformation agenda to overcome COVID realities August 5, 2020 Share StumbleUpon Gamesys tops list for GambleAware Q1 donations July 10, 2020 SBC Magazine Issue 10: Kaizen Gaming rebrand and focus for William Hill CEO August 25, 2020 Sharelast_img read more

Evglevski’s stunning silver

first_imgBy Hayley Wildes Twenty-year-old Berwick local, Sergei Evglevski’s maiden Commonwealth Games was extra memorable for many reasons. On top of…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img