Servant Mentorship

first_imgAlmost everyone recognizes how important mentoring is.  I don’t know anyone who is successful who did not have at least one good mentor. I  know I am grateful for mine.Similarly, I don’t know any good leaders who don’t mentor to some degree.  It is more than a mark of a good leader; the mentoring makes the leader stronger by what he or she learns from the mentee.Of course, people define mentoring differently.  It should be more simply than showing someone the ropes or sharing inside baseball.A good mentor should have a vested interest in helping his or her mentee succeed.  Yes, I recognize that this definition begins to bleed into sponsorship as many define it.However, I believe the line between mentorship and sponsorship can be somewhat artificial.  In my views, the best mentorships include a sponsorship component.  The term I use is “servant mentorship.”One way that mentors can sponsor mentees is by opening doors for them.  “I can’t do this but I think this would be a great opportunity for you.”In these cases, the mentor feels good about the opportunity that he or she has provided. While this may benefit the mentee too, the mentor is benefiting by having someone safe do what he or she cannot.Don’t get me wrong.  That’s not a bad thing.  But it’s not as wonderful as it may make the mentor feel.For me, the best test as to whether someone is a servant mentor is whether they lean back so their mentee can lean in.  That means giving up an opportunity for the mentee so that he or she can grow.“I can do this, but I think you would be great. If you want it, it’s yours.”Mentees know the difference.  And, I believe, they respond in kind.Opening a door for someone when you cannot walk in is not “servant mentorship.”  Not walking in the door when you can but sending your mentee instead is.Next month I will be giving my monthly slot to a mentee.  Thank you to SHRM for joining me in service mentorship.last_img read more

Teens Still Love Texting, But Mobile App Use is Growing

first_imgTexting is also now the number one reason why teens say they get a phone, with 43% reporting this as their primary reason for mobile adoption. Safety, the number one reason back in 2008, has now fallen to second place with only 35% citing this as the top reason. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces The growth in texting as a communication mechanism has also led to decreased voice usage. Voice activity is down 14% from last year. According to teens, texting is easier (22%) and faster (20%) than making a phone call. Data and Apps Usage Up TooWith the ever-lowering prices of smartphones and more affordable data options, it seems that smartphones and “smarter” feature phones are making their way into the hands of more teens. And with these data-ready phones comes increased data usage. In this young demographic group, 94% of teens saying they’re using Internet, messaging, multimedia, gaming and apps on their phones. In fact, this group has seen the largest jump, year-over-year, in data usage, going from 14 MB in Q2 2009 to 62 MB in Q2 2010, a fourfold increase. Males are consuming more data than females with 75 MB used vs. 53 MB for females. Application usage among teens is up, too, going from 26% last year to 38% this year. The mobile Web is used more than apps, however, with 49% reporting they surf the Net on their phones. A note on methodology: Nielsen surveyed 3,000 teens for this report and combined their answers with data from monthly phone bills of over 60,000 mobile customers, a large enough sample to point to these behaviors and increases as definite trends. sarah perez The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Tags:#mobile#NYT#Trends Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … New data from Nielsen out today delves into the behavior of the youngest mobile consumers: the American teenager. The study further solidifies what we’ve known for some time – teens are heavy-duty users of text messaging services. No other demographic group texts as much as teens do, with an average of 3,339 texts sent and received per month. (For girls, it’s even higher – 4,050 texts per month!)But the study also revealed that teens are now turning to mobile applications, too, with 38% of teens using downloadable apps like those from Facebook, Pandora and YouTube. And usage in this area is growing, says Nielsen. Texting Still Popular, Usage IncreasingNot surprisingly, Nielsen found teens text a lot. Any parent who doesn’t have their child on an unlimited texting plan is just setting themselves up for failure, it seems. According to Nielsen’s data, teens send out more than six messages per every hour they’re awake, an 8% increase since just last year.While females still text more than males (4,050 compared to 2,539 texts, females vs. males), the teen boys (ages 13-17) are still outpacing the other male age groups studied. Young adults (ages 18-24) are in second place overall with 1,630 texts per month. Related Posts last_img read more

Police thrillers: Khaki is the newest hue in Bollywood

first_imgGANGAAJAL: In Prakash Jha’s film, Ajay Devgan dons the uniform and plays an honest officer who takes on the baddiesViolence reverberates through the grimy, paan-stained corridors of Mumbai’s Directorate of Technical Education. Its majestic Indo-Saracenic central hall doubling as a post office after working hours is littered with broken furniture,GANGAAJAL: In Prakash Jha’s film, Ajay Devgan dons the uniform and plays an honest officer who takes on the baddiesViolence reverberates through the grimy, paan-stained corridors of Mumbai’s Directorate of Technical Education. Its majestic Indo-Saracenic central hall doubling as a post office after working hours is littered with broken furniture because Akshay Kumar in police uniform is trading filmi punches with Ajay Devgan.A biff and a bang later, director Rajkumar Santoshi yells “cut”, ending the pantomime on the sets of one of Bollywood’s biggest blockbusters, Khakee. The days Santoshi spent as chief assistant director to Govind Nihalani, tramping through the city’s police stations to recreate the filthy rooms and the rough police speak in the classic Ardh Satya, have stood him in good stead. The star-spangled Khakee, he promises, will be Bollywood’s closest look at the men in the force. Amitabh Bachchan is the honest IPS officer, Devgan the bad guy, Akshay is crooked and comic, and Tusshar Kapoor is the rookie. Trouble is there are a dozen films waiting in the wings, each promising to do just that. Not all of them have Khakee’s stellar line-up, but they collectively have more than Rs 100 crore riding on their back and a range of actors – from the Union shipping minister to a superbrat – in dust brown fabric packing a pistol. From Sunny Deol who grew a beard to play a rustic Sikh constable dispatched to New York in Jo Bole So Nihal to Nana Patekar playing a hardened encounter specialist in the Ram Gopal Varma factory’s Ab Tak Chappan. The call of duty has attracted even bad boy Salman Khan who, sample this for sheer irony, marched straight to the sets in starched uniform after being jailed for nearly a fortnight for mowing down a pavement dweller. Producer Sunil Mehta hasn’t decided what to call the Rs 25 crore film-Satyameva Jayate or Garv- but swears it is “Salman’s best performance till date”. Actors, evidently, are in short supply for such heavy duty acting. advertisementSATYAMEVA JAYATE Or may be Garv. The Khan brothers Salman Khan (right) and Arbaaz Khan team up as policemenShool’s steely officer Manoj Bajpai reprises the role in two films-Pankuj Parashar’s Inteqam and Mehul Kumar’s Jaago, based on the true story of a rape in a Mumbai local train. Three Khakee stars are doing double-shifts as law enforcers in other films-Devgan has just played Gangaajal’s upright officer while Bachchan hops sets to play policeman in Dev, Santoshi’s one-time mentor Govind Nihalani’s film. Akshay Kumar, who plays a conscientious officer in the Madhur Bhandarkar-directed Aan, sits in crisp uniform amid Khakee’s chaos and confesses with the frankness of a child in a candy store, “I read both scripts at around the same time, both were exciting.” The film’s other hero, Union Minister for Shipping Shatrughan Sinha, had to seek prime ministerial approval, no less, to don greasepaint and khaki. But producer Firoz A. Nadiadwala believes his Weapon of Mass Distraction will be Paresh Rawal who sparked off laugh riots in Hera Pheri. His barbs as the bribe-taking constable are specially penned by Neeraj Vora. Bollywood, used to herd-mentality, is dumb founded by the khaki deluge. “This hasn’t happened in the industry before, but it is no trend,” says trade analyst Amod Mehra. “Santoshi, Varma and Nihalani are serious film-makers, not proposal makers.” Varma wanted to make a film on the encounter specialists in the Mumbai Police. “They get a strange sense of achievement in numbers,” he says, explaining his film’s title, Ab Tak Chappan. “But each statistic represents a dead criminal. It is macabre.” After the superlative Ardh Satya and Drohkaal comes Dev where Nihalani realises his “ambition to work with Bachchan”. He won’t call it the last of his police trilogy but a “story of two friends who happen to be policemen”. DEV: In his third police film, Govind Nihalani (centre) fulfils his dream of working with Amitabh Bachchan (left) and casts him opposite the peerless Om PuriAs an after thought, he says it may be “the Ardh Satya for the new millennium”. Anurag Kashyap, scriptwriter of Shool and Satya, who is to direct Black Friday, a police procedural film on the 1993 Bombay blasts, and Allwyn Kalicharan on a corrupt policeman, Anil Kapoor, in a dystopic Delhi of 2015, explains the police obsession: “It is a fascination for the cop- and crime-genre and people who have the power to do the unthinkable and change lives.”Mumbai policemen are a richly mined vein- encounter specialist sub-inspector Daya Nayak inspires characters in Aan, Ab Tak Chappan and Kagaar while Kay Kay plays Additional Commissioner Rakesh Maria in Black Friday. In these all-male films, women are adornments-recruited for oomph, as Lara Dutta is in Aan, or to play a suffering wife like Gracy Singh in Gangaajal. Unless, of course, it is a policewoman played by Sushmita Sen in Samay, a serial-killer flick. “She is the woman in control,” says director Robby Grewal. The khaki wave even promises to do the unthinkable-be authentic. Former police commissioner M.N. Singh, who had a hitlist of films that showed his department in poor light, had to eat his words when he mistook Akshay Kumar-sporting a close crop and in a uniform stitched by the Mumbai Police’s official tailor-for one of his men at the mahurat of Aan. Designer Anna Singh saw her home deluged with bales of brown fabric when she agreed to design uniforms, over a 1,000 of them, for Santoshi’s film. “He is a perfectionist and wanted all the policemen dressed in the same shade of khaki,” says Singh. Bachchan’s IPS uniform had to be aged by 10 years by washing it every day for two months. Onscreen, however, khaki is the newest hue.advertisementlast_img read more

East Bengal players make a beeline for Mohammedan Sporting Club

first_imgCalcutta’s superstars in action: large-scale desertionsMass defection is no longer a monopoly of politicians. Last months, Calcutta’s East Bengal Club, second best in national football after Mohun Bagan Club, lost its star players as fast as a tree shedding autumn leaves. The East Bengal players were making a beeline for,Calcutta’s superstars in action: large-scale desertionsMass defection is no longer a monopoly of politicians. Last months, Calcutta’s East Bengal Club, second best in national football after Mohun Bagan Club, lost its star players as fast as a tree shedding autumn leaves. The East Bengal players were making a beeline for Mohammedan Sporting Club which, despite a glorious past, had been relegated to the number three position since a decade ago. The desertions sent a shock wave down the ranks of East Bengal’s millions of supporters, most of whom have emotional roots in the eastern parts of undivided Bengal.The man who turned out to be the Calcutta maidan’s (the complex of playgrounds in the heart of the city) Pied Piper of Hamelin this year is lean and wiry Surajit Sengupta, 27, the football equivalent of Amitabh Bachchan who was East Bengal’s ace forward till last year.Stung by criticism in his former club that he was off-colour last season, and hired by big money apparently offered by former smuggling-king Haji Mastan, the Mohammedan club’s newest patron. Surajit led altogether nine A-class players, five of whom are superstars, to don this season the Mohammedan club’s blue-and-white jersey. To give the deal a final Ian Fleming touch, it was signed in the cool shade by the swimming pool of Singapore’s Sea Lion Hotel.Salvage Operation: The players who have deserted East Bengal to join Mohammedan club are, apart from Surajit, Bhaskar Ganguly, 22, custodian and international player, stocky stopper-back Manoranjan Bhattacharya, wily striker Shabbir Ali, standby stopper Shyamal Ghosh, full-back Chinmoy Chatterjee, linkman and last year’s captain Prasanto Banerjee, powerful Nigerian striker David Williams and flank-man Mir Sajjad Ali. Remarked an East Bengal supporter: ‘”They’ve taken away the kernel and left the skin.”East Bengal’s stars sign a new contract: more moneyEast Bengal Club, who won the coveted Indian Football Association (IFA) Shield 15 times, had goose-pimples as it saw its cream crossing over. The club’s salvage operation began on a melodramatic note. It sent its 1980 captain, Satyajit Mitra, to Madras to intercept Manoranjan Bhattacharya on his return journey from Singapore. Mitra was accompanied by Bhattacharya’s father. The 70-year-old man wept, but still could not prevail on his son.Anticipating the transfer-spree a few months earlier. East Bengal had hired the Mohun Bagan coach and former international player P. K. Bannerjee to take the charge of their team, or whatever was left of it. The money involved in the deal here was reported to be astronomical.No Amateurs: Barring Bannerjee, Mohun retained more or less the same team as in 1979. It was even reinforced with the induction of Francis D’Souza, an international forward from Goa. With a few small changes here and there, it is the same team that has, over the past four years, won almost all the major tournaments in the country.East Bengal, who retained only the crumbs, was labouring to recruit second-liners and the erstwhile greats who had peaked out. But this is not likely to alter the new pattern of football rivalry that is bound to emerge in India. It looks certain now that Mohun Bagan will have to take on Mohammedan Sporting Club rather than East Bengal in its contest for supremacy.The Mohammedan Sporting Club deal exposes the hypocrisy involved in the smug assertion that football in India is an amateur game. The fact is, the game is now played for money and big money-just as it is played in Brazil or Argentina.Under the facade of amateurism, players get paid under the head of “facilities and perquisites”. And the colour of the money, needless to say, is a deep-hued black. With a dearth of world class players, the price for the player’s allegiance to a club rises. The player who got Rs 25,000 for a season in the “70s now demands and gets – Rs 50,000 plus many other facilities.Haji Mastan: a game of high stakesBig Money: The modus operandi is like this: the club officials rope in moneybags to finance players’ recruitment. The budget for an individual club has risen from Rs 5 lakh a few years ago to Rs 14 lakh this year. Haji Mastan, who made repeated hurricane trips to Calcutta recently, is this year’s sponsor for Mohammedan club.The football business in Calcutta, which involves a gate collection of Rs 2.5 crore every season, is wrapped up in a make-belief cloak of amateur football.With the kind of money invested this year, there is no reason why limited companies cannot be floated, in line with Manchester United of the UK, to sponsor official professional footballers.advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more