Northridge woman arrested in murder

first_imgHours after arresting a Northridge woman Thursday on suspicion of killing her ex-boyfriend, police believe they found the murder weapon hidden in the ceiling of her Palm Springs hotel room. And it didn’t have any sharp edges. Police said they believe Kimberly Carter, 43, shot Harry Phillips in the chest – although for two days they told the media Phillips, 42, had been stabbed to death. By putting out incorrect information, detectives said they hoped Carter would think she didn’t need to get rid of the gun, LAPD Detective Joel Price said. “She was probably thinking, ‘Who went in and stabbed him after I shot him?”‘ Price said. “Sometimes you have to be smarter than the crooks. Sometimes you have to play games with the crooks.” Carter said she last saw Phillips on Monday, according to Channel 4. She also played a recording of what she said was a voice mail message to her from Phillips in which he professed his love for her. Carter, who was on parole for robbing two banks in Detroit in 2000, was being transported late Thursday to Los Angeles, where police planned to question her. Phillips’ body was found Tuesday in the bedroom of a home on Garden Grove Avenue that Carter bought in December 2004, and where the couple lived with the suspect’s mother. But by December 2005, their relationship soured, Price said, and Phillips moved out and began dating a woman who lived in South Los Angeles. After the breakup, Carter moved to a home she owns in Henderson, Nev. The Garden Grove Avenue house had been left mostly vacant, although Carter’s mother and sister occasionally stayed there, Price said. Carter returned last weekend from Henderson and found her mother in the Garden Grove house. The two got into a fight, and Carter kicked her mother out of the house, police said. On Tuesday, Carter’s mother went to the Northridge home to pick up some of her things. She used her key to enter the house, and found Phillips’ body on the bedroom floor with a gunshot wound to the chest. Police believe he had been dead for at least 24 hours. “Why did they meet at the house?” Price said. “We may never know. Unless she tells us, we may never know.” Staff writer Dan Laidman and City News Service contributed to this report. Josh Kleinbaum, (818) 713-3669 josh.kleinbaum@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant Police found a handgun stashed in the ceiling of Carter’s room in the Spa Hotel & Casino in Palm Springs, where she stayed Wednesday night, Price said. “We believe that we will be able to match that gun up to ballistic evidence that we recovered at the scene” in her Northridge home, Price said. Carter surrendered to police Thursday morning in front of a TV camera crew in Palm Springs, where authorities also discovered Phillips’ missing Chevrolet Tahoe. KNBC (Channel 4) reported that Carter had called and asked for a camera crew because she was afraid of being mistreated by police. Speaking on camera before authorities arrived, Carter denied killing Phillips, saying, “I didn’t stab him.” “I left because he was cheating on me, and he asked me to come back,” Carter said. “I came back to talk, and, I don’t know what happened.” last_img read more

Should you get a genetic screen before having kids?

first_imgPreconception screening can help couples prepare for the possibility their child may be born with a medical condition. Pregnancy comes with many unknowns. Perhaps one of the most harrowing is whether a child will be born healthy. Now, preconception screening—looking at the genetic risk factors of both partners before they conceive—is starting to answer that question.Many companies offer an array of screens to prospective parents. But these typically focus on a few hundred conditions, and couples often have to select which they’d like to be tested for. The problem is that some recessive conditions don’t show up in family histories, and the partners themselves may never have symptoms—making it unlikely they’ll ask the right questions. Now, researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute’s Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium are trying to expand screening options using whole-genome sequencing, which allows researchers to look broadly for carrier risk rather than screening specific genes or targeted panels.Science spoke with Sue Richards, a clinical medical geneticist at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland and a leader of the project, about findings published today in The American Journal of Human Genetics. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Q: How is your screen different than other preconception screens?A: We screened for many genes that are not on any current carrier screening panel … using whole-genome sequencing. Laboratories like mine have been offering carrier screening for many, many years, [but] the paradigm is shifting now from doing screening for single genes and targeted well-known variants [for disorders such as cystic fibrosis] to really a very large number of genes. [With whole-genome sequencing], we had the opportunity to cast a very, very large net.Q: What did you want to find out from this study?A: We wanted to know how patients choose what they want to learn about. And then, when they get their results, how do they use that information? The goal is to really empower people so they can make informed decisions about reproductive choices.Q: What did you do?A: Anyone who chose to be in the study would be screened for any life-threatening … genetic disorders. Then those results would be reported back. Then, we gave them a whole list of other types of genetic disorders that they could get carrier testing for—more than 700—and asked them if they wanted to know their results … for severe disorders, mild disorders, adult-onset disorders, and unpredictable disorders, where you wouldn’t be able to be sure about the phenotype. One of the findings … was that most people, over 90%, wanted all categories returned.Q: What else did you find?A: We found that the majority of people carry a variant, at least one. Some [carry] up to five disease-causing variants for a rare disorder. Between 3% to 4% of people had findings that were medically important for themselves. They had some gene [variant] that [meant] later in life they could develop cancer or cardiac disease or something like that.Q: What are the upsides? Why would people want to get this new kind of testing?A: Because we were using this technology of whole-genome sequencing, we were able to screen and offer people additional information about their own personal health. If you have a clinically actionable variant that for example is going to predispose you to have breast cancer or colon cancer, then we would report that finding if they wanted that. It was interesting that 99% wanted [medically actionable] information back. I think it speaks loudly to the fact that people want to know this information when they’re given that choice.Q: What are the downsides?A: A general practice in genetics for diagnostic testing is to also report those variants we can’t interpret, and we don’t know if they actually cause disease or don’t cause disease. … This is a huge problem. What we wouldn’t want to end up doing is having patients with great anxiety or having a prenatal diagnosis done for a variant of uncertain significance because you wouldn’t be able to interpret anything and that’s not making an informed choice. That’s not good knowledge—that could be harmful.Q: When will whole-genome prescreens be commercially available?A: It might be a little premature yet to do that. It’s close to being ready, but there were some regions of the genome that even this technology doesn’t get yet. There’s some common genetic disorders where the genes are very similar to other genes … this doesn’t work well for that. If there’s a repeat region, like in a fragile X, or Huntington disease, those kinds of regions are hard to screen for. In a very few years, we’re going to be ready, certainly technology wise.Q: Would you recommend this new kind of testing?A: Just because you can do more, should you do more? In this study, we were conservative in our approach, and we only reported variants we were quite confident were pathogenic, disease-causing variants. There’s going to be a discussion that continues in the genetics community. … When is the appropriate time to offer it? Let’s [not] do it until we’re really ready to do it right, because we don’t want to make mistakes.*Correction, 11 May, 9:47 a.m.: The image has been updated; the previous image showed an incorrect DNA helix. Getty Images/iStockphoto By Roni DenglerMay. 10, 2018 , 11:25 AM Should you get a genetic screen before having kids?last_img read more