Study: Religious people are less likely to get bored — which makes them less inclined to search for meaning

first_imgShare Email Pinterest Share on Facebook Religiosity is associated with lower levels of proneness to boredom, according to new research published in the scientific journal Emotion.“Studies show that boredom propels people to seek for activities that are more fulfilling; acts that offer a sense of purpose and meaning. It follows that activities or beliefs that people feel gives them a sense of purpose should help to prevent getting bored. Yet, surprisingly, this had never been tested,” said study author Wijnand A.P. Van Tilburg of King’s College London. “We looked at religiosity because religious people tend to describe their beliefs as offering them a sense of meaning in life. Besides that, religion is of course an incredibly widespread phenomenon worldwide and affects many people. So, we were interested if religiosity, a source of meaning in life for many, might prevent boredom.”center_img Share on Twitter LinkedIn “The research had a secondary, more subtle, but nonetheless interesting purpose: If boredom normally makes people search for new purpose or meaning, then could it be that religiosity, through reducing boredom, indirectly prevents people from doing so?”Across three separate studies, with nearly 1,500 participants in total, the researchers found that religious people tended to feel less bored, which in turn was associated with a lower inclination to search for meaning compared to non-religious people. The participants included Christians, Agnostics, Atheists, Jews, Buddhists, Muslims, and Hindus.Non-religious people who were subjected to a mundane task — transcribing an excerpt about lawn mowing — tended to report higher levels of boredom. They were also more likely than religious people to say they wanted to do something of greater significance.“By reducing boredom, religiosity indirectly tempered the ‘quest’ for meaning,” van Tilburg told PsyPost. “To be clear: this does not mean that religious people do not search for meaning in their lives. Rather, the findings suggests that, counter-intuitively, religious people are less inclined to search for meaningful alternatives in situations where others would feel bored.”Religious people were more likely to perceive life as more meaningful to start with, which was in turn associated with less boredom. “The finding that a seemingly minor, everyday life, and mundane experience as boredom connects two variables of such existential and cultural significance as religiosity and meaning in life is, in our view, profound,” van Tilburg said.“The finding that boredom links these two variables showcases how relevant ‘mundane’ emotions are in people’s quests for making sense of their existence, simultaneously further grounding the psychology religiosity and meaning in ‘mundane’ life and revealing boredom as actor with a more significantly role than it is traditionally given.”But the study includes some caveats.“No single study or even series of studies can fully address complicated phenomena such as religiosity, meaning in life, and boredom. For example, people differ in the way they practice their religion: some may focus particularly on the social and community activities that come with it, whereas others may focus more on using religion as a guide through their lives,” van Tilburg explained.“In our research we have not yet made such important distinction. Could it be that the role of religiosity in reducing boredom depends on how people put their religion in practice? Furthermore, our studies focused mostly (though not exclusively) on Christians. Are there differences across religions? These are questions we have yet to find the answers to.”Previous research conducted by van Tilburg found a link between boredom and political extremism. “Throughout this and our other research we consistently find that boredom offers many surprises. It may seem like a mundane perhaps even trivial unpleasant experience but it turns out that it fulfills important psychological and social roles,” he added. “Boredom ‘wakes us up’ by stirring a desire for challenge and more meaningful activity. It propels people towards activities that they believe offer a sense of purpose and this can lead to a range of unexpected outcomes, including derogation of outsiders, retrieving self-soothing nostalgic memories, and turning to more extreme political views.”The study, “Bored like Hell: Religiosity reduces boredom and tempers the quest for meaning“, was authored by Wijnand A. P. van Tilburg, Eric R. Igou, Paul J. Maher, Andrew B. Moynihan, and Dawn G. Martin.last_img read more

Reprimand for barrister convicted of assault

first_imgA barrister who was convicted of assault has been reprimanded following a disciplinary tribunal hearing. According to a finding published by the Bar Tribunal and Adjudication Service (BTAS) Amiot Vollenweider has escaped fine or suspension. The barrister however, will have to receive ’advice as to his future conduct’ from the leader of the south-eastern circuit.The BTAS finding states that the incident occurred on 14 May last year, involving behaviour likely to diminish the trust and confidence the public places in the barristers’ profession.Vollenweider, called to the bar by Gray’s Inn in October 2000, was convicted on 31 May 2018. He admitted assault by beating and was fined £1,500 and ordered to pay a surcharge of £150 and prosecution costs of £85. A barrister of the same name appears on the website of Thomas More Chambers. He is described as a ‘leading junior counsel’ who acts in complex financial remedy cases.The chambers has been contacted for comment. The tribunal’s decision is open to appeal.last_img read more

Pete Shinnick Named D2Football.com National Coach of the Year

first_imgBoth players were voted onto the honorable mention list after earning second team All-America accolades last month from the Division II Conference Commissioner’s Association. Print Friendly Version Williamson had 70 tackles, 18 tackles for loss and 14.5 sacks. He established a new Gulf South Conference single-season record for sacks as well. The junior from Stockton, Alabama had at least one sack in each of the last seven games with 12 total over that time frame. Shinnick led the Argonauts to an 11-4 record and advanced to the NCAA Division II National Championship Game in their second season of competition. UWF went 5-3 in the ultra-competitive Gulf South Conference to finish tied for second. The Argonauts won a school record six-consecutive games which included five against nationally ranked teams en route to the title game appearance. Conley was one of the top defensive backs in the country, finishing with a team-high 104 tackles, four interceptions, six pass break ups, a fumble recovery and a forced fumble. The junior from Tampa had at least five tackles in 11 of 15 games this season, in addition to a pair of interception returns for a touchdown.center_img PENSACOLA, Fla. – UWF head football coach Pete Shinnick was named the D2Football.com National Coach of the Year, while standouts Marvin Conley and John Williamson were recognized as part of the organization’s All-America Team. The Argos had the nation’s 20th-ranked defense and were in the top 20 in sacks, turnovers gained, interceptions, fumbles recovered, fourth down defense and defensive touchdowns. Much of that was due to first-year defensive coordinator Darian Dulin’s group, including Conley and Williamson.last_img read more

Deery Series, Arnold Motor Supply Hawkeye Dirt Tour sweep puts Kay in IMCA record book

first_imgJustin Kay became the first driver to win IMCA Deery Brothers Summer Series Late Model and Arnold Motor Supply Hawkeye Dirt Tour Modified features on the same night Tuesday at West Liberty Raceway. (Photo by Mike Ruefer)WEST LIBERTY, Iowa (June 13) – Justin Kay’s first trip to victory lane Tuesday night at West Liberty Raceway put $1,000 in his pocket.His second put him in the record book.Already of the winner of the Arnold Motor Supply Hawkeye Dirt Tour for IMCA Modifieds, Kay be­came the first driver to win Dirt Tour and Deery Brothers Summer Series main events on the same night when he followed with a convincing run to the $2,000 IMCA Late Model tour checkers.“Winning both races is always the goal. We were really close one night in Tipton (in 2015) when we won the Deery feature and finished second in the Dirt Tour feature,” Kay said. “It’s really cool to be the first driver to win both events on the same night but I don’t think I’ll be the only one who does it.”The Deery win was Kay’s second straight and fourth of the season. Seven of his career 23 tour wins have come at West Liberty.The two-time series champion reeled in current point leader Jesse Sobbing for the lead at mid­way. The two swapped lanes and the lead while running in traffic before Kay got a five-car length advantage in the blink of an eye.His lead was half a straightaway on lap 30 and no one had anything for Kay in the final 10 cir­cuits.Sobbing settled for second and Denny Eckrich, winner of the April event at West Liberty, was third. Matt Ryan and Kyle Hinrichs completed the top five.Curt Martin was the $250 Sunoco Race Fuels feature qualifier drawing winner. Nick Marolf, Chad Holladay and Kay were $50 Malvern Bank heat race winners.Feature results – 1. Justin Kay, Wheatland; 2. Jesse Sobbing, Malvern; 3. Denny Eckrich, Tiffin; 4. Matt Ryan, Davenport; 5. Kyle Hinrichs, Swisher; 6. Chad Holladay, Muscatine; 7. Andy Eckrich, Oxford; 8. Jeremiah Hurst, Dubuque; 9. Darrel DeFrance, Marshalltown; 10. Ron Boyse, Kalona; 11. Jake Neal, Omaha, Neb.; 12. Nick Marolf, Wilton; 13. Ryan Dolan, Lisbon; 14. Rob Moss, Iowa City; 15. Curt Martin, Independence; 16. Curt Schroeder, Newton; 17. Jonathan Brauns, Muscatine; 18. Cayden Carter, Oskaloosa; 19. Joel Callahan, Dubuque; 20. Jeff Tharp, Sherrill; 21. Dave Wada, Wilton; 22. Kevin Kile, West Liberty.1st heat – 1. Marolf; 2. Ryan; 3. Callahan; 4. Boyse; 5. Andy Eckrich; 6. Kile; 7. Schroeder; 8. Moss.2nd heat – 1. Holladay; 2. Brauns; 3. Denny Eckrich; 4. DeFrance; 5. Martin; 6. Carter; 7. Wada.3rd heat – 1. Kay; 2. Dolan; 3. Sobbing; 4. Hinrichs; 5. Neal; 6. Hurst; 7. Tharp.last_img read more