World rail market June 2012

first_imgAustralia: NSW RailCorp has awarded Cubic Transportation Systems a three-year contract worth A$63m to support its ticket sales equipment. Brazil: Digicon has won a R$15m contract to supply ticket gates and passenger-counting systems for São Paulo metro Line 4. Switzerland: SBB has awarded Scheidt & Bachmann a SFr40m contract to supply 1000 ePOS ticket machines able to provide bank notes as change. RFID and barcode readers will be fitted for contactless payments. UK: Translink has ordered 275 Parkeon P50 hand-held ticket machines for cash, contactless smart card and chip & PIN payment. Gioconda has won contracts to supply desktop signalling sighting and driver briefing software to Network Rail, Amey and Atkins.last_img read more

Cardiff Blues Confirm Morgan Signing

first_imgThe fly half joined Bristol Rugby in 2014, scooping Championship Player of the Year in his first season with the Club.Morgan remains committed to Bristol until the conclusion of the campaign.last_img

Journey to World Cup starts here

first_imgSoccer By DENNYS IORERE It may be a long shot but never impossible. And for PNG Football Association Supporters Club chairman Dr Miok Komolong (picutured), he optimistic of having the PNG men’s team to Qatar in 2022 if not definitely to the United States in 2026. He said there were enough slots for Oceania region – one direct qualification or entry and the other a playoff for second place with South America. Dr Komolong was speaking during the launch of the PNGFA U-15 Festival Southern leg on Tuesday, he said there were enough slots for Oceania region – one direct qualification or entry. The Southern leg youth festival has attracted eight boys and six girls’ teams from the National Capital District and Central province who are currently competing until the finals on Sunday. “The supporters club, actually our number one goal is to building the national team and the women’s team as well but the flagship is the men’s national team (the Kapuls) – our goal is to enter our team in the World Cup if not in Qatar in 2022 definitely the USA in 2026,” he said. “This game does not end here, 2026 one or two or even four of you will make the national team and I look forward to that so all the best. We will support you. That is the mission of the supporters club. “When you graduate to the national team we will be there for you. We will make sure everything is done right for you so that you can carry the flag and represent your country with pride.” Dr Komolong has been involved with football because his children who had shown interest from Under 6 to U-12 to U-15 tournaments. He was one time a chairman of the local organizing committee in Lae in 2006. He was also the chairman of the Pikinini Soccer at the University of Technology in Lae, Morobe. “Out of that program that we ushered in there are now four of my boys from Lae in the national team if not six but some are on the fringes,” Dr Komolong said. He declined to name those players but his sons Alwin and Felix have come through the same process like you so it is important that this type of tournaments are organised well. “You get support from the parents and the teachers at this level and this is the grassroots of football that builds those players for national representative duties. So in the national team as the supporters club, we are gearing up to start the next journey. If you saw the Nation’s Cup last year, it was the supporters club that came and assisted PNGFA to bring our team and we almost beat New Zealand,” he said. “We unfortunately did not make it – that was the Nations Cup or the Confederations Cup; In the World Cup qualifiers we beat Tahiti. The supporters club was with PNGFA all along. I am saying this is because I think in this group one, two if not three, four of you will make it to the national team (Kapuls).”last_img read more

Don’t bother visiting White House: Trump to Philadelphia Eagles over anthem dispute

first_imgJoe Faraoni / ESPN Images(WASHINGTON) — Facing a growing boycott by Philadelphia Eagles players refusing to visit the White House Tuesday, President Trump decided to disinvite the Super Bowl champions and throw a celebration of the National Anthem instead, administration officials tell ABC News.Over the course of the last several days, many Eagles players have been backing out of attending the traditional presidential Super Bowl celebration because of Trump’s controversial comments about the NFL and players who have staged protests during the anthem.The president chose to change the nature of the event in light of the boycott, one official said.“He found having a smaller group come to the White House to be unsatisfactory,” the official told ABC.In an unusual move, Trump himself issued a statement Monday evening.“The Philadelphia Eagles are unable to come to the White House with their full team to be celebrated tomorrow. They disagree with their President because he insists that they proudly stand for the National Anthem, hand on heart, in honor of the great men and women of our military and the people of our country,” the statement said.“The Eagles wanted to send a smaller delegation, but the 1,000 fans planning to attend the event deserve better. These fans are still invited to the White House to be part of a different type of ceremony—one that will honor our great country, pay tribute to the heroes who fight to protect it, and loudly and proudly play the National Anthem. I will be there at 3:00 p.m. with the United States Marine Band and the United States Army Chorus to celebrate America.”Eagles fans who RSVPd can still come to Tuesday’s event but no one from the Philadelphia team or management will be attending, the source confirmed.Asked if any players were still invited to come to the White House, the official replied: “If they all decide to stand [for the anthem], we would be open to having that conversation.”Wide receiver Torrey Smith, who was part of the Eagles winning team but has since been traded to Carolina Panthers, tweeted back at the president over his statement.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMatico Relatedlast_img read more

Dutch design lab blends naturalistic and futuristic

first_img This Sept. 28, 2017 photo provided by the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, shows an Installation view of “Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital Age,” in New York. (Matt Flynn/Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum via AP) This Sept. 28, 2017 photo provided by the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, shows an Installation view of “Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital Age,” in New York. (Matt Flynn/Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum via AP) This Sept. 28, 2017 photo provided by the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, shows an Installation view of “Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital Age,” in New York. (Matt Flynn/Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum via AP) This Sept. 28, 2017 photo provided by the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, shows an Installation view of “Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital Age,” in New York. (Matt Flynn/Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum via AP) This Sept. 28, 2017 photo provided by the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, shows an Installation view of “Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital Age,” in New York. (Matt Flynn/Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum via AP)center_img This Sept. 28, 2017 photo provided by the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, shows an Installation view of “Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital Age,” in New York. (Matt Flynn/Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum via AP) Laarman and his team of computer scientists, engineers and craftsmen seem at first glance to get their inspiration from the past, with designs reminiscent of Art Nouveau or even rococo. “Gradient Lounge” is a generously sized chaise with voluptuous curves 3-D-printed from polyamide nickel and copper, with matching upholstery, 3-D-knit of silk, mercerized cotton and Merino wool. “Bridge Table,” the sleek show-stopper of aluminum and tungsten carbide that greets visitors in the main part of the exhibit, resembles a smooth, silver-colored tree, with four trunk-like legs that separate into branches and extend to support a gleaming, flat surface.But there’s nothing old-fashioned about these works.They are not inspired by nature so much as designed using actual mathematical principles of nature — algorithms drawn from plants, say, or multi-celled organisms. These algorithms are used to design the works created using 3-D printers or, in the case of the footbridge, using 3-D-printing robots invented by the team. Then the pieces are finished using a combination of high-tech and artisanal methods, such as binding the exteriors with nickel, copper or steel, or handcrafting elements out of wood.“The emphasis is on experimentation, and on looking to biology and physics for design inspiration,” explains Andrea Lipps, assistant curator of contemporary design at Cooper Hewitt, who oversaw the exhibit.Videos shown throughout the show help explain how the pieces were made and are crucial to understanding the works, since the techniques are so new, some of them only recently invented by the studio.“When people saw our exhibit in Holland, they got very emotional, and some of them even cried. The future can feel like a very scary place,” says Laarman, a soft-spoken 37-year-old who was in New York for the opening of the show.“Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital Age” will remain on view at the Cooper Hewitt through Jan. 15. It will then travel to The High Museum of Art in Atlanta (Feb. 18-May 13) and the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston (June 17-Sept. 9). The show, organized by each museum with slightly different works, has been expanded and updated since it originated at the Groninger Museum, in Groningen, Holland, in 2015.Joris Laarman Lab, founded by Laarman in 2004 with filmmaker and partner Anita Star, uses processes as innovative as the designs themselves.“The waves of technology are accelerating rapidly,” Laarman says, referring to a timeline featured along one wall in the exhibit; it shows waves of technological advances alongside stock market rises and downturns, and includes moments in the foreseeable future, like the arrival of driverless cars. On the timeline, the industrial age has fallen away precipitously and the digital age is blasting off in new directions.Laarman is optimistic.“Digital technology is changing our lives at every level. It’s very exciting. No one really knows how this next phase is going to happen. But I think it may start a whole new wave of creativity,” he says.“Creativity is the one most important thing we can do as humans,” he adds. “This new technology will make it easier to make a living off creative ideas, and create a direct line between creators and the public.”There is a tension in Joris Laarman Lab’s work between technology and traditional craftsmanship, and between ornamentation and function.The studio’s Heat Wave Radiator (acquired by the Cooper Hewitt, with functioning examples available for purchase), is made of concrete and is designed to be installed on the wall. It resembles some kind of industrial ivy, with each twist and curlicue adding to its efficiency as a heater.Currently, Laarman’s studio is at work producing the stainless steel bridge across a footbridge in Amsterdam using its own “MX3D” production method, which allows for 3-D printing in midair using robots. The technology opens the door to enormous 3-D-printed construction projects.A newly completed section of the footbridge, which has a soft, nubby texture like that of a handwoven rug, is on view.“Biotechnology and artificial intelligence are taking us to a very new phase,” Laarman says. NEW YORK | The first U.S. museum exhibit devoted solely to the experimental and futuristic work of Dutch design studio Joris Laarman Lab is now on view at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum here.The works — mainly furniture, along with an unusual radiator and a newly finished section of footbridge — tend to be curvy and organic in form, many resembling strange yet elegant life forms that have sprouted table legs and chair arms.last_img read more