SO Vermont Arts & Living Magazine to celebrate 10th anniversary

first_imgVermont Business Magazine SO Vermont Arts & Living magazine announced today that it will celebrate its 10th anniversary with a special 10th Anniversary issue due out in January, 2018, featuring a gatefold of past covers that showcases the works of prominent artists in the region, which has become the magazine’s trademark.“We’ll take a look back at how the magazine started, and why, and where we are today,” said owner and publisher Lynn Barrett. We’re also announcing the SO Vermont Arts & Living Cultural Hero Award that will be give annually to the person or organization that has done the most to advance the arts and culture of Southern Vermont. Of course we’ll recognize our community partners, writers, designers, and everyone involved with the magazine. It’s hard to believe that 10 years have gone by. We’ve grown in terms of enhanced events, exhibitions, readership, content and social media. But, the start-up was a leap of faith.”Before moving to Vermont, Barrett specialized in marketing and public relations for CBS, other Fortune 500 companies and her own firm, Primetime Concepts in Manhattan. “Starting a publishing company was not on my list when I came here,” she says.Barrett’s first foray into the magazine business came in 2005 with the Andy Warhol exhibition at the Brattleboro Museum when the Brattleboro Reformer invited her to sell ads and help produce Andy Warhol, The Jon Gould Collection. “I’d never sold an ad in my life, but I was game.”She subsequently worked with the daily newspaper to produce and market other publications centered around the arts and the local economy, including “Southern Vermont Arts,” a glossy magazine that became the inspiration for her own publishing undertaking.“The idea to publish a magazine to promote the arts and lifestyle of not just Brattleboro, but all of Southern Vermont, seemed like the next logical move,” Barrett says. “Who else was going to promote Southern Vermont? The state’s tourism marketing was focused north of Rte 4.”She began publishing SO Vermont Arts & Living independently in 2008, bringing the same premise and mission to the new magazine, which she describes as “a postcard to the world about Southern Vermont.”The magazine focuses on the arts, culture, and lifestyle that chronicles the rural yet sophisticated world of Southern Vermont. It’s distributed in two Welcome Centers and throughout Southern Vermont and the neighboring towns along the borders of New York, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Target readers are residents and tourists who are drawn to cultural and lifestyle coverage and are looking for things to do in the region. “We reach them where they live and where they visit,” she says.The magazine’s departments focus on a specific niche of Vermont’s lifestyle including Personalities; Entrepreneurs; Spotlights on productions and openings (Museums, Art Galleries, Antiques, Theater, Dance, Music); Design Observed; Food & Wine; New and Notable and Calendar of Events. The magazine also offers editorial space in “Talk of the Arts” pages for cultural commentary.SO Vermont Arts & Living’s team is comprised of Jeff Potter, design; Martin Langeveld, website; Eric Pero, calendar listings; along with a host of seasoned professional writers, including Joyce Marcel, Jon Potter, Arlene Distler, Susan Smallheer, Meg Brazill, Kathleen Cox, Nicole Colson, Kevin O’Connor, and Marty Ramsburg—all experts on various aspects of the arts and its impact on the local economy and local culture.“While the magazine has evolved over the last 10 years, the editorial focus of the magazine remains true,” she says.Barrett says that the magazine wants to know: Who are we?  Why do we come here? Why do we stay? How do we live? How do we work? How are we inspired? How do we inspire others? What do we care about? How do we play? Whom do we turn to for advice, information, and expertise? How are we fulfilling our dreams? What do we want for the future?“These are the questions we try to answer,” she says.  ‘We love hearing from our readers and their stories. In fact, we want to hear from folks specifically about why they love Southern Vermont. And we want to know about their biggest challenges.”The magazine is “conducting a little kitchen research,” says Barrett, who can be reached at vermontartsliving@gmail.com(link sends e-mail).“With the world changing so fast, it’s not easy to predict what will happen next,” Barrett says, but she believes in the power of the magazine to help celebrate a region—and to get readers locally to perceive their own area as a special place with the capacity to capture visitors’ hearts, minds, and spirits.While many communities have turned to the arts to revitalize themselves and strengthen their economies, without a vehicle to promote the critical mass of activities, events, people, cultural experiences, and sense of place, many well intentioned efforts fall short of their full potential. Further, the lack of such a promotional tool diminishes all efforts to market the region as a vital, attractive destination. SO Vermont Arts & Living is that promotional tool that positively impacts the region,” she believes.And one editorial style decision reflects those values.“We believe in Southern Vermont with a capital S,” Barrett says. “Southern Vermont is not just an adjective. Southern Vermont is a destination.”Source: DUMMERSTON CENTER, VT—SO Vermont Arts & Living 11.16.2017,Yeslast_img read more

Fourth US soldier killed in Niger ambush identified

first_imgU.S. Army(WASHINGTON) — The Pentagon has identified the fourth U.S. soldier killed in the West African nation of Niger earlier this week in an ambush believed to have been carried out by an Islamic extremist group.Sgt. La David T. Johnson, 25, from Miami Gardens, Florida, was assigned to the 3rd Special Forces Group based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Johnson had been initially listed as missing following Wednesday’s ambush that took place in a remote area along Niger’s border with Mali.He was one of about a dozen U.S. Army soldiers conducting a joint patrol with about 40 soldiers from Niger when they came under attack by about 50 enemy fighters.In addition to the three other U.S. soldiers killed along with Johnson, a soldier from Niger also died from the attack. Two other American soldiers were wounded in the ambush and were as of Friday receiving medical treatment at a U.S. Army hospital in Germany.Johnson’s remains were recovered on Friday by soldiers from Niger near the site of the ambush after an intense search for the missing soldier by forces from the U.S., Niger and France.Prior to the discovery of Johnson’s remains, U.S. Africa Command spokesman Col. Mark Cheadle said “more than a hundred” U.S. military personnel, including special operations forces, had been sent to Niger to assist with a possible rescue operation in the event the missing soldier was being held captive.Cheadle said the U.S. “had an idea” of which Islamic extremist group may have been responsible for the attack.“We are resolved and stalwart in our efforts to go after those who attacked,” the spokesman said.Various extremist groups operate along the Niger-Mali border area, including Ansar Dine, an al Qaeda-affiliated extremist group, and ISIS-West Africa.Johnson enlisted in the Army in January 2014 as a wheeled-vehicle mechanic and was assigned to the 3rd Special Forces Group, a Green Beret unit.His awards and decorations include the Army Achievement Medal, the Army Good Conduct Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Medal, the Army Service Ribbon, the Army Parachutist Badge, the Army Air Assault Badge, the Driver and Mechanic Badge, and the Marksmanship Qualification Badge – Sharpshooter with Rifle.“The Bush Hog formation [Johnson’s battalion] was made better because of Johnson’s faithful service and we are focused on caring for the Johnson family during this difficult period,” said Lt. Col. David Painter, commander of 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne).The three other U.S. Army soldiers killed in the attack were identified by the Pentagon on Friday. They all served with Special Operations Forces and were based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Two, including Johnson, were support personnel, and two were Green Berets.Staff Sgt. Bryan Black, 35, Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Johnson, 39, and Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, 29, died from wounds sustained during the ambush that occurred near Niger’s border with Mali about 125 miles north of Niamey, Niger’s capital.Staff Sgt. Bryan Black of Puyallup, Washington, who enlisted in the Army in October 2009, was a Green Beret serving as a Special Forces medical sergeant. His awards and decorations includes the Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Special Forces Tab, Ranger Tab, Parachutist Badge, Air Assault Badge, and Marksmanship Qualification Badge – Sharpshooter with Rifle.Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright of Lyons, Georgia, enlisted in the Army in July 2012 and was a Green Beret serving as a Special Forces engineer sergeant. His awards and decorations included the Joint Service Achievement Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Special Forces Tab, and Parachutist Badge.Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Johnson of Springboro, Ohio, enlisted in the Army in October 2007 and served as a chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear specialist attached to the Green Beret unit.His awards includes the Army Commendation Medal (2nd Award), Army Achievement Medal (5th Award), Army Good Conduct Medal (3rd Award), National Defense Service Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Armed Forces Service Ribbon, Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon, Army Service Ribbon, Parachutist Badge, Air Assault Badge, Driver and Mechanic Badge, and Marksmanship Qualification Badge – Expert with Pistol and Rifle.There are about 800 U.S. military personnel in Niger helping that country’s counterterrorism efforts against extremist groups. Some of the U.S. forces are part of a drone surveillance mission over Mali that operates out of Niger’s capital of Niamey.Others are involved in a training-and-advising mission with Niger’s military to improve its counterterrorism capabilities and the construction of a second drone base in northern Niger.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMatico Relatedlast_img read more