Best of Instagram

first_imgShare This!This Best of Instagram shows off some truly beautiful scenery within both Disneyland and Walt Disney World resort.If you’re new to this weekly series, I post highlights from our Instagram page, along with a top comment featuring YOU, our subscriber.Enjoy!July 23, 2018(I’m putting the “Top Comment(s) of the Week” here because all of these captions are absolute gold!)July 25, 2018 July 26, 2018July 27, 2018 Should this article inspire you to give our Instagram page a follow, I’ll leave the link right here: http://www.instagram.com/touringplanslast_img read more

Amazon beta testing Influencer Program aimed exclusively at social media bigwigs

first_img HomeDigital MarketingAmazon beta testing Influencer Program aimed exclusively at social media bigwigs Amazon beta testing Influencer Program aimed exclusively at social media bigwigsYou are here: Related postsLytics now integrates with Google Marketing Platform to enable customer data-informed campaigns14th December 2019The California Consumer Privacy Act goes live in a few short weeks — Are you ready?14th December 2019ML 2019121313th December 2019Global email benchmark report finds email isn’t dead – it’s essential13th December 20192019 benchmark report: brand vs. non-brand traffic in Google Shopping12th December 2019Keep your LinkedIn advertising strategy focused in 202012th December 2019 Amazon is beta-testing an invite-only Influencer Program that will give social media influencers an Amazon.com vanity URL to make commissions on sales of products they want to promote.Reported last week on TechCrunch, the program is similar to Amazon’s affiliate program in that the influencers — like affiliates — will earn a commission on products purchased via links attached to their Amazon URL. But, unlike the Amazon Affiliate program, which is open to anyone who wants to join, the Amazon Influencer Program is invite-only for social media influencers Amazon deems worthy of inclusion.From the Amazon’s Influencer Program details page:The Amazon Influencer Program is exclusively designed for social media influencers with large followings and a high frequency of posts with shoppable content. An intuitive vanity URL makes it easy for customers to find, browse and buy the products introduced to them through social media influencers. The program allows influencers to earn fees for purchases they drive through their social media platforms.To be considered for the program, Amazon says applications will be evaluated on things like the number of followers an influencer has on various social platforms, their engagement on posts, the quality of their content and level of relevancy for Amazon.com“There is no set cut-off and influencers across all tiers and categories are represented in the program,” says Amazon.The TechCrunch report included comments from Liane Mullin, the president and COO of the YouTube channel “What’sUpMoms,” who is already part of Amazon’s Influencer Program.“We are constantly asked by our community for product recommendations and about the products used in our videos,” says Mullins in the TechCrunch report, “Now that we have our own Amazon store [it] makes it much easier to have a curated collection all in one spot.”To submit applications, social media influencers must follow directions listed on the Amazon Influencer Program page. According to Amazon, only influencers with large followings who meet the program’s qualifications will receive an invite — and that, because of the volume of submissions, anyone who applies will only be contacted if they are invited to join the program.From our sponsors: Amazon beta testing Influencer Program aimed exclusively at social media bigwigs Posted on 4th April 2017Digital Marketing FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+sharelast_img read more

Lawmakers Question IRS’s New Sole-Source Identity Verification Contract with Equifax

first_imgLogin to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative. The House Ways and Means Oversight Subcommittee held an October 4 hearing on the IRS’s efforts and challenges toward modernizing its information technology (IT) infrastructure. Witnesses from the IRS, Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) and Government Accountability Office (GAO) testified before the subcommittee.Antiquated TechnologyThe IRS is currently operating on out-of-date, antiquated hardware and software, IRS officials Jeffrey J. Tribiano, deputy commissioner for operations support, and Silvana Gina Garza, chief information officer, both testified. “Approximately 64 percent of IRS hardware is aged and out of warranty, and 32 percent of software is two or more releases behind the industry standard, with 15 percent more than four releases behind,” they noted in their shared written testimony.Depleted Budget ResponsibleAccording to Tribiano and Garza, the IRS’s depleted budget over the years is largely to blame. However, President Trump’s fiscal year (FY) 2018 budget requests $2.07 billion for information services; $216.1 million above current FY 2017 levels. Additionally, Trump’s budget proposes reinstating the IRS’s streamlined critical pay authority. The loss of critical pay authority hurt the IRS’s ability to recruit and retain experienced IT managers, the officials noted while encouraging Congress to approve the proposals.Subcommittee Chairman Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., stated that the IRS’s management decisions must be included in the discussion. “As we examine tax administration reforms, we welcome a discussion on changes to the IRS IT budget. However, changes to the budget must be coupled with better management and governance of the resources the IRS already has,” Buchanan said.Equifax ContractAdministrative decisions, such as the IRS’s September 29 contract with Equifax following that company’s massive data breach, was of particular concern among lawmakers. “More than 20 days had passed since we learned of the greatest data breach in history, and you just signed a contract to pay Equifax to have access to IRS data for identity verification purposes,” Rep. Jackie Walorski, R-Ind., said. The IRS officials testifying did not have any information to provide on why the contract was executed.Senate ConcernsMeanwhile, across the Capitol, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin G. Hatch, R-Utah, and ranking member Ron Wyden, D-Ore., also expressed their concern as to the IRS’s contract with Equifax. In an October 4 bipartisan letter to IRS Commissioner John Koskinen, the SFC leaders requested information about why the IRS moved forward with the contract.“Last month, the Committee wrote to Equifax regarding the data breach that is now estimated to have exposed the personally identifiable information of at least 145-million Americans,” Hatch and Wyden wrote. “We were taken aback when it came to our attention that last week the IRS awarded Equifax a sole source contract worth over $7 million for “verifying taxpayer identity and…assisting in ongoing identity verification and validations needs of the Service,”” the taxwriters added. Hatch and Wyden requested a response by the IRS and a copy of the IRS/Equifax contract by October 11.By Jessica Jeane, Wolters Kluwer News Stafflast_img read more

The Social IT Professional

first_imgThe role of the CIO and IT professionals has significantly changed in the last decade. In today’s professional landscape, an IT professional is poised to lead the charge for technological innovation. As David A. Bray, CIO of the Federal Communications Commission, said in a interview with The Washington Post, “We need leaders who do more than keep the trains running on time. CIOs and CEOs can work together to digitally transform how an enterprise operates.”But, according to CIO magazine’s 2015 State of the CIO survey, CIOs were viewed as business leaders by just 13 percent of colleagues outside of IT and only 30 percent of line-of-business leaders. Obviously, there’s still a significant gap in the C-suite perception of IT. But there’s also a significant opportunity. As any digital professional will tell you, the best way to solve a perception problem is to be more visible. Say goodbye to the IT professional tucked away in the basement and say hello to the age of the social techie.Teaching Techies to be SocialitesIt’s been clear for some time that social media is essential to successful businesses, providing the opportunity to not only serve their customers better, but to learn from them. The same is true for the social IT professional. Through social media, an IT professional is able to engage in and help shape the changing conversation around IT. They’re able to expand their knowledge and skills through peer collaboration and partnerships born online. And, by adopting a more open and collaborative mindset, the social IT professional is able to begin to solve their perception problem.One CIO leading the charge to bring IT out of the shadows and into the social spotlight is Intel’s very own Kim Stevenson. Ranked as one of the most social CIOs by the Huffington Post in 2015, Kim has long been an advocate of shaking up the IT department and what’s expected of it. As she stated in a Forbes interview, “On the leadership front, I challenged IT to take bigger risks and to move beyond ‘what you know’ to ‘what’s possible.’ IT had gotten into a comfort zone taking small risks and only solving problems we knew how to solve, which yielded incremental improvements. If we were going to meet the needs of the business, we needed to be operating at a higher level of risk.”Beyond changing the perception of IT, becoming social can provide hungry IT professionals with a personal classroom for learning and innovation, helping them to stay on the cutting edge of the latest technology.Now that you now why you should get social, it’s time to learn how to get social. In my next blog, I’ll go into how you can kickstart your social persona.Until then, check out this list of the most social CIOs in 2015. I’d love to hear your thoughts on the benefits of the social CIO and the hurdles that are preventing more CIOs from jumping in. Leave your comments below or continue the conversation on Twitter @jen_aust and on LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/in/jenniferaust.last_img read more

‘Armored lizard’ was ancestor of today’s turtles

first_imgIt’s a primitive turtle, but it looks nothing like today’s dome-shelled reptiles. Resembling a broad-bodied, short-snouted lizard, the 240-million-year-old creature—dubbed Pappochelys rosinae—appears to be a missing link between prototurtles and their modern relatives, according to a new study. If so, the find could fill in a number of pieces about turtle evolution.The findings are “a very important contribution in addressing who turtles are related to, as well as the evolutionary origin of the turtle shell,” says Tyler Lyson, a vertebrate paleontologist at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science who was not involved with the study. “These have been two vexing questions for evolutionary biologists for the last 200 years.”About two dozen or so fossils of the creature have been recovered, all of them from 240-million-year-old rocks deposited as sediment on the floor of a shallow, 5-kilometer-long lake in what is now southern Germany. Most of the remains include only bits of bone and are from individuals of various sizes, says Hans-Dieter Sues, a vertebrate paleontologist at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. But between the two most complete specimens yet found, he and Rainer Schoch, a paleontologist at the State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart in Germany, have put together a full skeleton and most of a skull.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)P. rosinae adults likely measured about 20 centimeters long, with half of that being a long, whiplike tail. (The species name is a combination of the Greek words for “grandfather turtle” and the person who helped clean rock from the fossils to prepare them for analysis.) Its peglike teeth suggest the animal fed on worms and other soft-bodied prey, Sues says. Yet skeletal anatomy reveals Pappochelys was no run-of-the-mill lizard, Sues and Schoch report online today in Nature.  Unlike lizards, but much like the earliest known relative of turtles (Eunotosaurus, which lived in what is now South Africa about 20 million years earlier), Pappochelys’s ribs are broad, dense, and have a T-shaped cross section. In later, full-shelled species of turtles, those ribs are even wider and have fused with each other and certain bones in the shoulder girdle to form a carapace, or upper shell. But unlike the earlier Eunotosaurus, Pappochelys has gastralia, or belly ribs. These free-floating bones developed within the tissue of the underbelly, Sues says; in more evolved species of turtles, these gastralia broaden and fuse to form a plastron, or lower shell.Because the fossils were originally entombed in lake floor sediments, the researchers suggest that Pappochelys spent a lot of its time in the water and around the lakeshore—a lifestyle similar to that of today’s marine iguanas, Sues says. So having broad, dense bones and gastralia would have acted like a diver’s weight belt, helping Pappochelys fight buoyancy and forage on the lake’s bottom. But these bones would also have had a beneficial side effect: They would have offered some degree of protection from predators, such as large amphibians or fish living in the lake, by deflecting or blunting their bites.“In the water, predators can get you from all angles,” Sues notes. Over millions of years, evolution sculpted the bones to create the full set of body armor seen in modern-day turtles. The first full-shelled turtles show up in the fossil record about 205 million years ago.The two distinctive holes on the side of the head behind each eye of Pappochelys provide vital clues to the evolutionary heritage of turtles, says Torsten Scheyer, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland who was not involved in the work. Those holes mark the species as a member of the diapsid (“two arches”) group of reptiles. That diapsid group includes crocodiles, lizards, snakes, dinosaurs, and their surviving kin, birds. But because modern turtle skulls lack these holes, some scientists have proposed that turtles were the last surviving members of an anapsid (“no arches”) lineage of reptiles. But now, he adds, these fossils of turtle progenitors firmly back up the results of genetic analyses of living reptiles: Turtles belong on the diapsid branch of the reptilian family tree.Scheyer says fossils that are even more complete, or ones that have the bones preserved in more lifelike arrangements, would provide better information about the species. “I’m really looking forward to see more research done on these outstanding fossils.”last_img read more

Portugal beat Argentina in friendly with Ronaldo vs Messi a sideshow

first_imgRaphael Guerrero of Portugal (left) celebrates with Ricardo Quaresma after scoring the only goal against Argentina. (AP Photo)’Cristiano Ronaldo vs Lionel Messi’ got top billing at a packed Old Trafford but it was a lesser light who scored as Portugal scraped a 1-0 friendly win over Argentina on Tuesday.Raphael Guerreiro headed the winner in added time after a second half riddled with substitutions and missing the excitement factor provided by the game’s two biggest players who did not reappear after halftime.With Messi and Ronaldo on the field, Argentina showed what coach Gerardo Martino is looking for from his team, a quick-passing possession game with fast thrusts forward.They dominated the opening half-hour in which they could have scored at least twice, the first chance a shot from Angel Di Maria, playing at the home of his club Manchester United, that skimmed the outside of the post after he was set up by Messi.Argentina’s closest effort was in the 11th minute when Messi beat the offside trap to reach a through ball on the right and came in at a tight angle, his low shot from the edge of the six-yard box beating Beto but glancing off the post and back into play.As the half-hour approached, Messi crossed, Javier Pastore headed and Beto dived to save before Ronaldo raised the decibels in the stadium when he backheeled a neat pass to Bosingwa then raced into the box to take the right back’s cross but his shot after two dummies went over the bar.advertisementIt was the signal for Portugal to come out of their shell for the last 15 minutes of the half and put the Argentine defence under pressure but Martino’s side managed to play their way out of trouble.After a lukewarm start to the second half, Di Maria had a shot from outside the box saved by Beto before Carlos Tevez came on for Gonzalo Higuain to boos from fans of his former team Manchester United but he did not make an impact.The game failed to pick up its first half rhythm and quality, despite an end-to-end flow, thanks to the high number of substitutions as every player in the two squads appeared to be getting a chance to play.Portugal looked like they wanted it more towards the end and a lucky bounce set up Ricardo Quaresma to cross from the right and give substitute Raphael Guerreiro a free header for the only billing at the goal.last_img read more

East Bengal players make a beeline for Mohammedan Sporting Club

first_imgCalcutta’s superstars in action: large-scale desertionsMass defection is no longer a monopoly of politicians. Last months, Calcutta’s East Bengal Club, second best in national football after Mohun Bagan Club, lost its star players as fast as a tree shedding autumn leaves. The East Bengal players were making a beeline for,Calcutta’s superstars in action: large-scale desertionsMass defection is no longer a monopoly of politicians. Last months, Calcutta’s East Bengal Club, second best in national football after Mohun Bagan Club, lost its star players as fast as a tree shedding autumn leaves. The East Bengal players were making a beeline for Mohammedan Sporting Club which, despite a glorious past, had been relegated to the number three position since a decade ago. The desertions sent a shock wave down the ranks of East Bengal’s millions of supporters, most of whom have emotional roots in the eastern parts of undivided Bengal.The man who turned out to be the Calcutta maidan’s (the complex of playgrounds in the heart of the city) Pied Piper of Hamelin this year is lean and wiry Surajit Sengupta, 27, the football equivalent of Amitabh Bachchan who was East Bengal’s ace forward till last year.Stung by criticism in his former club that he was off-colour last season, and hired by big money apparently offered by former smuggling-king Haji Mastan, the Mohammedan club’s newest patron. Surajit led altogether nine A-class players, five of whom are superstars, to don this season the Mohammedan club’s blue-and-white jersey. To give the deal a final Ian Fleming touch, it was signed in the cool shade by the swimming pool of Singapore’s Sea Lion Hotel.Salvage Operation: The players who have deserted East Bengal to join Mohammedan club are, apart from Surajit, Bhaskar Ganguly, 22, custodian and international player, stocky stopper-back Manoranjan Bhattacharya, wily striker Shabbir Ali, standby stopper Shyamal Ghosh, full-back Chinmoy Chatterjee, linkman and last year’s captain Prasanto Banerjee, powerful Nigerian striker David Williams and flank-man Mir Sajjad Ali. Remarked an East Bengal supporter: ‘”They’ve taken away the kernel and left the skin.”East Bengal’s stars sign a new contract: more moneyEast Bengal Club, who won the coveted Indian Football Association (IFA) Shield 15 times, had goose-pimples as it saw its cream crossing over. The club’s salvage operation began on a melodramatic note. It sent its 1980 captain, Satyajit Mitra, to Madras to intercept Manoranjan Bhattacharya on his return journey from Singapore. Mitra was accompanied by Bhattacharya’s father. The 70-year-old man wept, but still could not prevail on his son.Anticipating the transfer-spree a few months earlier. East Bengal had hired the Mohun Bagan coach and former international player P. K. Bannerjee to take the charge of their team, or whatever was left of it. The money involved in the deal here was reported to be astronomical.No Amateurs: Barring Bannerjee, Mohun retained more or less the same team as in 1979. It was even reinforced with the induction of Francis D’Souza, an international forward from Goa. With a few small changes here and there, it is the same team that has, over the past four years, won almost all the major tournaments in the country.East Bengal, who retained only the crumbs, was labouring to recruit second-liners and the erstwhile greats who had peaked out. But this is not likely to alter the new pattern of football rivalry that is bound to emerge in India. It looks certain now that Mohun Bagan will have to take on Mohammedan Sporting Club rather than East Bengal in its contest for supremacy.The Mohammedan Sporting Club deal exposes the hypocrisy involved in the smug assertion that football in India is an amateur game. The fact is, the game is now played for money and big money-just as it is played in Brazil or Argentina.Under the facade of amateurism, players get paid under the head of “facilities and perquisites”. And the colour of the money, needless to say, is a deep-hued black. With a dearth of world class players, the price for the player’s allegiance to a club rises. The player who got Rs 25,000 for a season in the “70s now demands and gets – Rs 50,000 plus many other facilities.Haji Mastan: a game of high stakesBig Money: The modus operandi is like this: the club officials rope in moneybags to finance players’ recruitment. The budget for an individual club has risen from Rs 5 lakh a few years ago to Rs 14 lakh this year. Haji Mastan, who made repeated hurricane trips to Calcutta recently, is this year’s sponsor for Mohammedan club.The football business in Calcutta, which involves a gate collection of Rs 2.5 crore every season, is wrapped up in a make-belief cloak of amateur football.With the kind of money invested this year, there is no reason why limited companies cannot be floated, in line with Manchester United of the UK, to sponsor official professional footballers.advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

3rd ODI: Kedar Jadhav ton leads India to series sweep

first_imgKedar Jadhav’s first international century led India past Zimbabwe by 83 runs in the third one-day game and a series sweep on Tuesday.Jadhav’s 105 not out formed the backbone of the India innings at Harare Sports Club, rescuing the 2011 Cricket World Cup champion from 82 for 4 in a 144-run partnership with Manish Pandey.Pandey made 71, and India reached 276 for 5 in 50 overs.Zimbabwe was bowled out for 193, with allrounder Stuart Binny taking 3 for 55 for India with his seamers. Mohit Sharma, Harbhajan Singh and Axar Patel shared two wickets apiece.Murali Vijay was the surprising wicket taker when he trapped E Chigumbara leg before for 10.Touring with an under-strength team led by stand-in captain Ajinkya Rahane, India clinched a whitewash and got better during the series, winning games by four runs, 62 runs, and then by Tuesday’s comfortable margin.Earlier, Zimbabwe won the toss and elected to field. After 21.4 overs, the India were tottering at 82 for 4 before Jadhav and debutant Pandey stitched the vital partnership. Robin Uthappa was the other major contributor with 31 runs of 44 balls at number three. The men in blue finished 276 for 5 in their quota of 50 overs. Chasing, Zimbabwe built a base for themselves at 150 for 3 in the 35th over, led by Chamu Chibhabha’s 82. But the hosts lost their last seven wickets for 43 runs to hand India a 3-0 series sweep.Kedar Jadhav was adjudged the Man of the Match and Ambati Rayudu was awared the Man of the Series. The teams move on to a two-game Twenty20 series starting on Friday. advertisementlast_img read more