Emotionally supportive relationships linked to lower testosterone in men

first_imgLinkedIn Science and folklore alike have long suggested that high levels of testosterone can facilitate the sorts of attitudes and behavior that make for, well, a less than ideal male parent.It has long been known that among humans (and some other species as well), males who cooperate amicably with their female mates in raising and nurturing offspring often have lower testosterone levels than their more aggressive and occasionally grumpy counterparts. But two University of Notre Dame anthropologists are looking beyond the nuclear family for such effects.Not only spouses, but also other relatives, good friends, colleagues, neighbors and fellow church members can play a role, suggest Lee T. Gettler, assistant professor of anthropology and director of the Notre Dame’s Hormones, Health, and Human Behavior Laboratory, and Rahul C. Oka, Ford Family Assistant Professor of Anthropology, in an article forthcoming in the journal Hormones and Behavior. Email Share on Twitter The new study focuses on a large, representative sample of aging U.S. men and the ways their testosterone varies when they have emotionally supportive relationships.“Compared to other U.S. men, fathers and married men often have lower testosterone,” Gettler said. “We think this helps them be more nurturing. We are the first to show that this also occurs with other social relationships. Our results show that when older men have emotionally supportive relationships with their siblings, friends, neighbors and coworkers, they also have lower testosterone.”According to Gettler, “We know that men and women with social support have much better health, overall, while testosterone affects risks for depression, cardiovascular disease, obesity and some cancers. We hope our findings, connecting these two areas, help stimulate new conversations about social support, biology and well-being.“Most of us have probably seen the TV commercials promoting testosterone as a remedy for symptoms of aging or ‘manopause.’ Our findings suggest that the social side effects of these testosterone supplements in older men should be carefully studied. While testosterone does go down with age, the potential social benefits that can accompany lower testosterone suggest it is not all doom and gloom.”center_img Share Pinterest Share on Facebooklast_img read more

Russia: Construction of Muchke Bay Terminal Begins

first_imgThe construction of a dedicated coal terminal started on the coast of the Tatar Strait in the far east on December 11, 2013.The builders of the SK MOST Group of Companies have excavated about 700,000 cubic meters of soil as part of the area grading for building a dedicated coal terminal in the Muchke Bay near the town of Vanino.The project customer is LLC Sakhtrans, and OJSC USK MOST is the contractor. The preparatory work as part of the first phase of the construction project aimed at building a dedicated coal terminal in the Muchke Bay, Vanino District of the Khabarovsk Region started in July this year.Currently, the work sites and access roads were put in place on the coast of the Tatar Strait; rock and crushed stone were placed in the motorway bed; a view point was paved with concrete, and grading of the area with a footprint of about 200 hectares is underway.The construction of a dedicated modern coal and iron ore concentrate transshipment terminal on the Pacific coast of Russia is scheduled for the years 2013-2016. The projected annual capacity of the terminal is 10-12 million metric tons, with an expansion potential to 27 million metric tons.[mappress]Press Release, December 23, 2013last_img read more

Bookies cheer as first 10 NCAA games covered by underdog

first_imgLAS VEGAS (AP) — Bookmakers had something to cheer about Thursday, even if the underdogs didn’t always prevail in the NCAA Tournament.Favored teams took a beating to open the tournament, with underdogs covering the spread in the first 10 games, beginning with the play-in games earlier in the week. In seven of those games, the team oddsmakers figured would lose ended up winning outright.“The dogs got out of the chute fast,” said Nick Bogdanovich, the oddsmaker for the William Hill betting chain. “It was very, very rare, just one of those things where the streak just kept going.”That was good news for this city’s legal sports books, most of which were packed with hundreds or even thousands of fans who came to town to celebrate — and bet — on March Madness. Since the general public tends to bet favorites more than underdogs in the tournament, the bookies were ahead early.“We don’t talk about the weekend until it’s Monday morning,” said Jimmy Vaccaro of the South Point hotel. “But so far obviously the mainstream guys are not doing too good.”The biggest outright win against the spread was UAB’s 60-59 victory over Iowa State. The Blazers were 13.5-point underdogs going into the game.It wasn’t until Xavier beat Mississippi 76-57 as a two-point pick that a favorite finally covered the spread.Bogdanovich said bettors for the most part didn’t pay attention to the streak of underdogs covering. But he said some bets shifted against Oklahoma after three Big 12 teams lost early.last_img read more