Consuming violent media linked to 13x surge in violent dreams

first_imgPinterest LinkedIn The violent and sexual media you consume during the day may infiltrate your dreams at night, new research suggests.People who reported consuming violent media within 90 minutes of bedtime were 13 times more likely to have a violent dream that night, the study found. Those viewing sexual media were six times more likely to have a sex-related dream.The study of more than 1,000 Turkish residents also found that the more violent media content they reported consuming on a regular basis, the more often they said they had violent dreams in general. Share Share on Facebookcenter_img Share on Twitter Email The same link was found between sexual media content and sexual dreams, although the connection wasn’t as strong.“The media we consume can have an impact on us even when we’re sleeping,” said Brad Bushman, co-author of the study and professor of communication and psychology at The Ohio State University.“We knew our violent and sexual media consumption had an impact on our waking lives. Now we have evidence of how it may influence our dreams.”The study is published online in the journal Dreaming. Bushman conducted the study with Jan Van den Bulck, a professor of communication studies at the University of Michigan; and Yakup Çetin of Fatih University and Ömer Terzi of Yildiz Technical University, both in Turkey.The study involved 1,287 people aged 10 to 60 who completed a survey about their media consumption and their dreams. About half the sample were students at schools in Istanbul. The remainder were adults recruited from social networking sites that discussed media.All participants were asked whether they had viewed any violent or sexual media content within 90 minutes of going to bed the night before the study, and whether they had any violent or sexual dreams that night.Slightly less than half of participants (45 percent) reported consuming violent media before bed that night, whereas slightly less than one-quarter reported exposure to sexual media content.Whether they had consumed violent or sexual media content was not associated with whether they dreamed that night, findings showed.But the fact that violent and sexual media use was related to a huge increase in related dreams showed the power media may have on our sleeping lives, Bushman said.“The magnitude of the increase in violent and sexual dreams linked to media consumption was surprising,” he said.The study also aimed to examine how overall media use was linked to dream content.Participants were asked the number of hours they spent consuming media (including TV, internet, DVDs, movies, video games and music) on any devices on weekdays and on weekends.Next, they were asked to rate whether the media they consumed contained violence and whether it contained sex on a scale of 1 (never) to 5 (always).They were then asked whether they dreamed and whether their dreams included violent content and sexual content. Again, they rated how often on a scale of 1 to 5.Overall, 67 percent of participants said they dreamed at least sometimes.More than 80 percent of participants said they were exposed to violent media content at least sometimes, whereas about half said they were exposed to sexual media content at least sometimes.About 80 percent of those surveyed said they had violent dreams sometimes, whereas slightly less than half said they had sexual dreams sometimes.The researchers found that overall media use was a significant predictor of more frequent dreaming, as was the frequency of exposure to violent media.So who had the most frequent violent dreams overall? Results showed that exposure to violent media was the stronger predictor, although people who reported more overall media exposure and more sexual media exposure also reported somewhat more violent dreams.As for sexual dreams, those who reported the most also tended to have consumed more sexual media. But the link between sexual media and sexual dreams wasn’t as strong as that between violent media and violent dreams.“Whether we looked at overall media use or media intake for just one day, the result was the same: The media we consume is linked to what we dream about,” Van den Bulck said.The results can’t reveal the direction of causality between dreams and media use, Bushman noted.“It is at least possible that people who have more violent or more sexual dreams are more likely to seek out that content during the day. Another possibility is that causality may go both ways, or that some other factor is related to both media consumption and dream content.“But I do believe that the most plausible explanation is that the media we consume influences our dreams,” Bushman said.Çetin said the results may be at least somewhat different for people in other countries, noting previous research has shown that media use and dream associations differ for people of varied cultural background.The results suggest one obvious recommendation for those who are troubled by their violent or sexual dreams, according to Bushman.“It would be good to avoid media with violent and sexual content, especially right before bed.”last_img read more

‘Knife in back’ claim over RTA data sharing

first_imgA representative of RTA solicitors said today he feels as if he has been ‘knifed in the back’ in the debate over a stalled scheme to share fraud data with insurers. Craig Budsworth, chair of the Motor Accident Solicitors Society, told the Manchester Law Society conference that the Association of British Insurers (ABI) had written to the House of Commons inquiry on whiplash saying that claimant firms might exploit any data its members released on fraud.Budsworth said he had worked for months with the ABI to find a way that insurers can share information with law firms about potential fraud. But in the letter, sent last August, ABI director general Otto Thoresen blamed claimants for changing their demands and putting a halt to negotiation.Budsworth said the letter added: ‘One of the main challenges is agreeing exactly what data we can usefully share with claimant lawyers without exposing insurers to unnecessary risk, for example, it is crucial that the data we provide cannot be used to ”phish” for potential new claimants.’Budsworth, whose group was earlier praised by the ABI for its willingness to talk, said the insurance body should write again to the transport committee to explain the truth.’We thought we were achieving something. We didn’t put the boot into the ABI and say how they put up barriers time and again, only to be knifed in the back. They have deliberately attempted to mislead ministers about what is going on.’ABI senior policy adviser Rob Cummings said the letter was a response to the committee’s report in July on whiplash, and that the organisation still expected to make an announcement on data sharing by the end of the year. He added: ‘This was only after claimant lawyers tried to put blame on insurers. The ABI is working out with its members how to fulfil their part of the bargain.’Data sharing is considered an essential part of plans to reduce the cost of whiplash fraud. The justice secretary Chris Grayling recently urged insurers to share what information they have with lawyers on the other side.last_img read more

Jason Momoa, Brad Pitt, George Clooney celebrated in new ‘People”s “Sexiest Man Alive” issue

first_imgABC/Rick Rowell(LOS ANGELES) — While it’s already known that EGOT winner John Legend has succeeded Idris Elba as People‘s Sexiest Man Alive, the magazine’s cover feature also celebrates less controversial picks in various categories.For example, Brad Pitt and Jason Momoa are part of the 28 “Men of the Year,” described as “standouts of modern-day sophistication.” They join the likes of current Men’s Health cover model and This Is Us star Sterling K. Brown, as well as Last Christmas heartthrob Henry Golding.And yes, Elba — who some might argue is eternity’s Sexiest Man — is included on the list as well.Speaking of eternally sexy, the magazine also highlights silver foxes like George Clooney, and the Social Security-eligible sexiness of 64-year-old Denzel Washington. They, Hugh Jackman, Matt Damon, and Bradley Cooper, are heralded in People‘s “Still Sexy After All These Years” category, which highlights former “Sexiest” cover stars.Here’s a roundup of People‘s choices:Men of the Year: Brad Pitt Jason MomoaSterling K. Brown Tom Hanks Paul Rudd Aaron Paul Henry GoldingMatt Czuchry Taika Waititi Desus & Mero Tony Dokoupil The Jonas Brothers Idris Elba Keanu Reeves Ben Platt Andrew ScottDavid Harbour Shawn Mendes Mena Massoud Bill HaderYahya Abdul-Mateen IITan France Mike ColterJohn KrasinskiMark Consuelos Still Sexy After All These Years (Former Sexiest Men Alive):  George Clooney (1997, 2006); David Beckham (2015); Denzel Washington (1996); Hugh Jackman (2008); Bradley Cooper (2011); Dwayne Johnson (2016); Matthew McConaughey (2005); Matt Damon (2007).Various:Sexiest Instagram:  Channing TatumSexiest Funny Guy: Trevor NoahSexiest Import:  Chris HemsworthSexiest New Dad:  Prince HarrySexiest Newly Single: Liam HemsworthSexiest Gym Addict:  Zac EfronSexiest Newcomer: Lil Nas XSexiest Reality Star: Antoni PorowskiSexiest TV Host: Terry CrewsSexiest Superhero: Tom HollandSexiest Heartthrob: David DobrikCopyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reservedlast_img read more