The Lightning Thief Begins Its Journey on Broadway

first_img Related Shows On the heels of celebrated off-Broadway and touring engagements, The Lightning Thief, the rollicking stage adaptation of Rick Riordan’s young adult fantasy novel, moves to Broadway’s Longacre Theatre on September 20. The musical will officially open on October 16 and continue for a limited run through January 5, 2020.Featuring a score by Rob Rokicki, a book by Joe Tracz and direction by Stephen Brackett, The Lightning Thief follows Percy Jackson on a fantastical journey across the United States in search of Zeus’ lightning bolt.The Broadway cast is led by Chris McCarrell, who repeats his acclaimed off-Broadway and touring turn as Percy Jackson, with Kristin Stokes as Annabeth, Jorrel Javier as Grover/Mr. D., Ryan Knowles as Chiron, James Hayden Rodriguez as Luke, Jalynn Steele as Sally and Sarah Beth Pfeifer as Clarisse. Rounding out the company are T. Shyvonne Stewart, Izzy Figueroa and Sam Leicht.The production features choreography by Patrick McCollum and musical direction by Wiley DeWeese, with scenic design by Lee Savage, costume design by Sydney Maresca, lighting design by David Lander, sound design by Ryan Rumery and orchestrations by Rokicki and DeWeese. Kristin Stokes Chris McCarrell in the 2017 off-Broadway staging of “The Lightning Thief”(Photo: Jeremy Daniel) Chris McCarrell Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 5, 2020center_img View Comments The Lightning Thief: The Percy Jackson Musical Star Files Jorrel Javierlast_img read more

NCSS names Todd Bauman executive director

first_imgVermont Business Magazine On March 1, 2017, the Board of Directors of Northwestern Counseling & Support Services, Inc (NCSS) selected Todd Bauman as the agency’s next executive director. Starting in July, Bauman will follow in the footsteps of Ted Mable, who has served as the agency’s leader since 1998. Bauman was recommended to the Board of Directors by the hiring committee after a nationwide search and vigorous review of 68 applications. Bauman’s 28-year career in mental health and government—12 of which have been at NCSS as the director of Children, Youth & Family Services—has more than prepared Bauman to lead the organization.As director of Children, Youth & Family Services, Bauman oversees 280 employees providing developmental, mental health, and substance abuse supports to the people of Franklin and Grand Isle Counties. When Bauman began as director in 2005, the division employed 60 people. Bauman’s collaboration with community and state partners has allowed for the development of programs that serve children diagnosed with Autism; provide mobile outreach to children in crisis; meet the treatment needs of adolescents struggling with substance abuse; and provide home-based supports to new mothers.  In addition, Bauman has collaborated closely with area schools to develop positive behavioral supports that promote a culture of wellness. Bauman’s ability to collaborate with community partners has allowed for innovative approaches to the way families access and receive services.  Before coming to NCSS, Bauman worked as Operations Chief for five years at the Vermont Department of Mental Health. He was responsible for bringing local teams together to promote community partnerships with the goal of providing an effective children’s behavioral health service delivery system. While in this role, Bauman developed structures to assess outcomes and aggregate data across the Vermont system of care. Prior to working for the Vermont Department of Mental Health, Bauman was a crisis clinician through the Howard Center and managed a residential emergency and assessment program.Bauman’s vast clinical experience and education—he has a master’s in clinical psychology from Saint Michael’s College—is only part of what made him an ideal candidate for the role of executive director. Bauman is an experienced public speaker in a variety of settings, including academia and government; he will be a powerful and much needed voice for NCSS.Bauman is also dedicated to his family including his wife Nicole, and two teenage children, Abigail and Owen. Both children belong to regional youth dance groups; he and Nicole spend much of their free time attending their performances. Bauman also enjoys camping, skiing, baseball and spending time with parents, who recently moved to the area.Since 1958, Northwestern Counseling & Support Services, Inc, a private, non-profit, human services agency has been serving Franklin and Grand Isle Counties.  NCSS provides intervention and support to children, adolescents, and adults with emotional and behavioral problems; a mental illness diagnosis; an intellectual disability or developmental delay.Bauman is poised to lead NCSS forward in the future so that it can continue to provide high quality services that produce excellent outcomes.Source: St. Albans – NCSS March 16, 2017last_img read more

Attachment anxiety heightens aversion toward pattern deviancy, according to new psychology research

first_imgShare on Facebook Email Anxieties about one’s close relationships are associated with aversion towards pattern deviancy, according to new research published in the European Journal of Social Psychology.“I’ve always been fascinated with objects, experiences, and situations that are irregular, abnormal, and break the pattern of what we are used to. I’ve consistently found that people tend to feel negatively about such ‘deviant’ stimuli. The obvious next question was to ask where these negative attitudes towards deviancy come from,” explained study author Anton Gollwitzer, a PhD Candidate at Yale University.Two initial surveys of 239 participants found a link between attachment anxiety and aversion toward pattern deviancy. People who agreed with statements such as “My desire to be very close sometimes scares people away” and “I often worry that my partner doesn’t really love me” tended to also say that broken patterns of geometric shapes made them feel uncomfortable, anxious, or annoyed. Pinterest LinkedIncenter_img Share on Twitter The researchers then conducted an experiment with another 333 individuals, which found that participants who were asked to recall a relationship where they felt anxiously attached tended to have heightened aversion towards broken geometric patterns compared to participants who were asked to recall a relationship where they felt comfortable and secure.A second experiment with 501 participants replicated the findings with a different measure of pattern deviancy aversion. Instead of being asked to evaluate patterns of geometric shapes, the participants were simply asked how they felt “about things that break a pattern, are out of line, and are disordered.”“Anxiety in terms of our social relationships can have a far-reaching impact on our lives, including nonsocial outcomes. Although we tend to think of our social and nonsocial attitudes as independent, our social experiences can actually alter the way we more generally approach objects, experiences, and situations,” Gollwitzer told PsyPost.Future research could address why the association between attachment anxiety and aversion toward pattern deviancy exists.“Is the link between anxious attachment and disliking broken patterns functional in some way? For instance, do unstable social relationships serve as a signal for dangerous irregularities in the environment? If true, then anxious attachment may heighten people’s dislike of broken patterns to help them avoid these harmful irregularities,” Gollwitzer said.The study, “Anxious Attachment as an Antecedent of People’s Aversion Towards Pattern Deviancy“, was authored by Anton Gollwitzer and Margaret S. Clark. Sharelast_img read more

China reports 17 H7N9 cases as fast disease progression noted

first_imgChina’s weekly number of H7N9 avian flu cases continues to slowly decline following an unprecedented spike of cases over the winter, with 17 more illnesses, 3 of them fatal, reported in the past week.Also, a research team from China published an analysis of cases in Jiangsu province this season, which raises questions about whether illnesses have become more severe over the past few H7N9 waves.New cases in 6 Chinese provincesCiting mainland health officials, Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection (CHP) said today in a weekly update that 17 new cases were reported from Mar 24 to Mar 30 in six provinces, most of them in Hunan, Jiangsu, and Guangxi provinces. All patients were adults, with illness onsets ranging from Mar 6 to Mar 24.Sixteen of the patients had exposure to poultry or poultry markets, a known risk factor for contracting H7N9.China has now reported at least 555 cases and 179 deaths in the fifth H7N9 wave. The country first reported the disease in 2013.Experts probe reasons for H7N9 surgeThe analysis of H7N9 cases in Jiangsu province appeared yesterday in the latest issue of Eurosurveillance.Jiangsu is one of the most affected provinces regarding H7N9 cases and is part of southern China’s poultry production hub. The report by Jiangsu researchers covers 109 fifth-wave cases reported through Jan 31, a number that exceeds all of the cases reported for the first four H7N9 waves in that province.Ten of Jiangsu’s 13 cities have been affected this season, with officials reporting a possible human-to-human case cluster and a coinfection with seasonal flu, presumably H3N2.The demographic profile of Jiangsu’s cases this season is similar to previous H7N9 waves, but the investigators said that, over the past three waves, disease progression seems faster, with the median time from symptom onset to intensive care unit admission decreasing from 9 to 10 days to 7 days. Likewise, the median time from symptom onset to death has also become shorter: 13.5 for the current wave, compared with 15 to 28 days for the last four waves.Genetic analysis of strains from recent Jiangsu cases, however, showed no known mutations that would make the virus more transmissible to people, easier to spread among people, or resistant to neuraminidase inhibitors, the most commonly used class of antiviral drugs.A December spike in cases could have been influenced by weather conditions as well as higher levels of contamination in poultry, the authors said, adding that an increase in environmental positives hints that the virus might be more resistant to higher ambient temperatures. They added, though, that more work is needed to analyze genetic sequences and to study the interactions among the factors that lead to human infections.Several cities, including Suzhou, Wuxi, and Changzhou, temporarily closed live-poultry markets in December, which was followed by a case decline in January, with an even steeper drop in February.The group concluded that it’s crucial to monitor the pandemic potential and the impact that recent genetic changes may have on the poultry industry. Also, they said more efforts are needed to more quickly identify the disease in people, especially at community clinics, which is where nearly half of H7N9 patients first seek medical care.See also:Mar 31 CHP H7N9 updateMar 30 Eurosurveill reportlast_img read more

Stewardship / Resistance Scan for Mar 29, 2019

first_imgChinese surveillance study finds multidrug-resistant E coli in foodA surveillance study by Chinese scientists has found multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strains in food products carrying the MCR-1 and blaNDM-1 resistance genes, and mobile genetic elements similar to those found in human strains, according to a paper yesterday in Eurosurveillance.Among the 1,166 non-repeated cephalosporin-resistant E coli isolates recovered from 2,137 samples of pork, beef, chicken, and shrimp bought at markets in Shenzen, China, from 2015 through 2017, the scientists identified 390 and 42, respectively, that were resistant to colistin and meropenem, and 5 isolates that were resistant to both antibiotics.Among the 390 colistin-resistant E coli isolates, the rate of resistance to colistin rose from 26% in 2015 to 46% in 2017, while rates of meropenem resistance in the 42 meropenem-resistant isolates increased from 0.3% in 2015 to 17% in 2017.Further screening found that all of the colistin-resistant isolates carried the MCR-1 gene and 36 of the 42 meropenem-resistant isolates carried the blaNDM-1 gene, with six harboring the blaNDM-5 gene; the five isolates that were resistant to both colistin and meropenem were carrying both MCR-1 and blaNDM genes. Notably, the scientists identified plasmids—in particular the ca 46kb IncX3 plasmid—that have been commonly reported in colistin- and carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates but not in isolates from animals and food. Conjugation experiments revealed that the colistin and meropenem resistance phenotypes of the 5 MCR-1 and blaNDM-bearing strains were transferable to other E coli strains of food origin.The authors of the study say the isolation of E coli strains harboring blaNDM-1 and MCR-1 that structurally resemble clinical strains has not previously been reported, and warn that the rising prevalence of these strains could mean an increase in severe, multidrug-resistant foodborne infections.”The increasing prevalence of Enterobacteriaceae strains carrying bla NDM and mcr-1 in food products will lead to increased colonisation of the human gastrointestinal tract with these Enterobacteriaceae strains, a phenomenon that has been associated with the high prevalence of drug-resistant infections in clinical settings,” they write. “Further surveillance of bla NDM-1 and mcr-1 in other food products is warranted.” Mar 28 Eurosurveill study Study in Georgia finds poor long-term outcomes for XDR-TB treatmentA study today in Open Forum Infectious Diseases reports high mortality among patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) in the former Soviet republic of Georgia, with most deaths occurring post-treatment.In the retrospective population-based cohort study, researchers from Emory University and Georgia’s National Center for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases assessed end-of-treatment and long-term outcomes in patients with XDR-TB. They also evaluated risk factors for poor outcomes. Patients were treated by directly observed therapy in accordance with 2011 World Health Organization (WHO) treatment guidelines for drug-resistant TB; the drug regimen did not include the newer agents bedaquiline and delamanid, which are now recommended under current WHO guidelines.From 2011 through 2013, 111 patients initiated treatment for XDR-TB; end-of-treatment outcomes were available for 106. Of those patients, 35 (33%) had a favorable outcome from initial XDR-TB treatment and 71 (67%) had an unfavorable outcome, with 16 (15.1%) dying. After cessation of initial XDR-TB treatment, an additional 20 of 90 (22.2%) patients who were alive at the end of treatment died, increasing the overall mortality rate to 34% (36 of 106). In multivariable analysis, the main factor for post-treatment mortality was unfavorable initial end-of-treatment outcome (adjusted odds ratio, 14.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.78 to 117.3).”The results of our study highlight the need for better surveillance during and after treatment for highly drug resistant TB,” the authors of the study write. “After treatment cessation, public health resources should focus on continual monitoring of patients given a significant risk of mortality and relapse.”Mar 29 Open Forum Infect Dis abstract Darden commits to buying chicken raised without antibiotics Multi-brand restaurant operator Darden Restaurants yesterday announced it will phase out the routine use of medically important antibiotics in its chicken supply chain by 2023.The commitment to buying chicken raised without medically important antibiotics is part of a wider animal welfare policy that the company, whose brands include Olive Garden and The Capital Grille, is adopting. The policy aims to increase mobility, lower injury and mortality rates, and reduce stress and fear among the farm animals in its supply chain.In addition to responsible use of antibiotics, Darden has identified humane housing, avoidance of pain, slaughter practices, and farm animal transportation as priority areas for improvement.Darden operates more than 1,700 restaurants in North America.Mar 28 Darden Restaurants press releaselast_img read more

Obituary: Hope Ann-Marie Jaramillo (Wagner) March 1, 1969 – Jan. 29, 2020

first_imgHOPE ANN-MARIE JARAMILLO (WAGNER) March 1, 1969 – Jan. 29, 2020 Hope Ann-Marie Jaramillo (Wagner), beloved wife, mother, sister, friend and daughter of Raymond and Mary Wagner, passed away peacefully surrounded by loved ones. Hope is survived by Joe Jaramillo (husband), and daughters Taylor Jaramillo, Jordan Jaramillo and Terri Jaramillo as well as extended family.Hope was a long time resident of Los Alamos and graduated from Los Alamos High School in 1987. She has a lifetime passion for softball and served her community coaching. Momma Hope was a mentor, coach and always welcomed people with open arms.Hope was a devoted wife, mother and sister. Her smile brought joy to all who knew her. Her sense of humor made her your friend when you met her. Her dedication and stubbornness made her a champion for her family and friends.Hope’s passion for life will be missed and this community lost one of its shining lights.Hope’s wish was that any girl she coached would wear their jersey as a remembrance. Hope’s funeral will be at Immaculate Heart of Mary on Saturday February 1st at 11:00 a.m. Interment will follow immediately after. All are welcomed.A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Saturday, February 1, 2020 at 11:00 am at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church, followed by burial at Guaje Pines Cemetery. All are invited to a reception, following the burial, at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish Hall. Hope’s wish was that any girl she coached would wear their jersey to her funeral as a remembrance.Hope’s family has entrusted her care to Rivera Family Funerals & Cremations of Los Alamos, located at 1627 A Central Avenue, Los Alamos, NM 87544, (505) 663-6880, www.riverafamilyfuneralhome.com.last_img read more

Outdoor Dining Hearing Closed

first_imgA public hearing allowing small take-out restaurants to add up to 16 sidewalk seats as part of East Hampton Town’s Downtown Montauk Outdoor Dining Right-of-Way Pilot Program closed at the town board’s meeting last Thursday.Under the program, the fire marshal’s office would review the locations of tables, making sure passersby have enough room to walk, and approve a permit to the tune of $150.“We know everyone likes to dine outside during the summer, so we hope this makes it good for businesses, and makes it clear for code enforcement,” said Councilwoman Sylvia Overby, who is the board’s liaison to the Montauk Citizens Advisory Committee.Springs resident David Buda questioned whether there were any provisions within the program to protect against any litter generated from the takeout restaurants.Overby said there aren’t any provisions in the proposed program, but there are in the town code. She said she believed the businesses, Montauk Chamber of Commerce, and the town could work together to ensure litter does not get out of hand.The chamber has installed trash cans for recyclables, which are sponsored by local businesses, and the town has been picking the refuse up, Overby said.“Always, litter is a problem,” she added.The proposal came out of the town’s business committee. It’s the third part of the pilot program legislation, which first made it possible for restaurants to have outdoor dining, then was followed by a provision allowing smaller takeout restaurants to have 16 seats in their establishments.In other Montauk news, the board moved forward with plans to pursue temporary housing for seasonal workers in Montauk. The town is sending out a request for proposals, which will be due back by July 31. A pre-proposal meeting will be held on May 9. The idea behind the project is to provide affordable local housing for the hamlet’s seasonal workforce, which would also reduce the amount of congestion on the roadways in the summer season.The board approved $150,000 in funding for the Hampton Hopper to run a shuttle bus in Montauk for the summer season. The cost will be offset by a $100,000 in state grant funding set aside by Assemblyman Fred Thiele.The Ditch Witch was approved once again as the town’s mobile concessionaire for Otis Road at Ditch Plains Beach. The bid came in at $12,825.Also, at the town board meeting:• The board scheduled public hearings on the acquisition of properties under the Community Preservation Fund. The properties included 105 Sycamore Drive, Springs for $290,000 and 269 Fairview Avenue, Montauk for $585,000, respectively.• Christine Ganitsch was appointed to the CPF Advisory Board.• Oyster gardening fees for the East Hampton Shellfish Education and Enhancement Directive were set at $250 for first-year oyster gardeners and $150 per year thereafter. The fee will entitle oyster gardeners access to oyster growing gear, assistance from the town’s shellfish hatchery staff, and oyster seed in order to maintain their crop of 1000 oysters as determined by New York State.The town’s hatchery will also assist oyster gardeners who would like to cultivate oysters off their own docks for an initial fee of $350, under the assumption that the farmer would keep the gear used to grow oysters. The farmers would also have to obtain a license to collect shellfish from the state Department of Environmental Conservation.Subsequent sustaining member fees would be $100 and would entitle the gardener an annual allotment of new oyster seed in order to maintain their state allotment of oysters.peggy@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

National Drug Takeback Day

first_imgSouthampton Town is participating in the federal Drug Enforcement Agency’s National Drug Take Back Day Saturday, April 27.Because unused medications that are not disposed of can end up in the hands of the most vulnerable populations, like children, and flushing medications down a toilet could ultimately result in them entering the aquifer and polluting the drinking water, the town is hosting takebacks through its police department at three separate locations to help keep the community safe and clean.According to a 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, six million Americans misused controlled prescription drugs that year. The study shows that most abused prescription drugs were obtained from family and friends, often from the home medicine cabinet. The DEA’s Take Back Day events provide an opportunity for Americans to prevent drug addiction and overdose deaths.Collection sites will be at Hampton Bays Community Center, 25 Ponquogue Avenue, Hampton Bays; Flanders Community Center, 655 Flanders Road, Flanders; and Southampton Town Police Substation at the Bridgehampton Commons, 2044 Montauk Highway, Bridgehampton, from 10 AM to 2 PM. Liquid medications, syringes, sharps, and thermometers are not accepted. The drop-off service is free and confidential. For more information about the disposal of prescription drugs or about the National Drug Take Back Day event, go to takebackday.dea.gov or call the Southampton Town Police Evidence & Property Section at 631-702-2254.desiree@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

Hydrogen research wins major award

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GasSecure achieves world first in wireless gas detection

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img