Few opioid-addicted youth get standard treatment medication

first_img Please enter a valid email address. About the Author Reprints WATCH: How you fight opioid addiction — with opioids Leave this field empty if you’re human: “The take-home message for parents is: If you have a child struggling with opioid addiction, understand that there are medications that support and sustain recovery,” said study author Dr. Scott Hadland of Boston Medical Center.advertisement By Associated Press June 19, 2017 Reprints Hadland was following a hunch when he began the study last year. In his practice, he was seeing more young people addicted to opioids. Many already had been through multiple treatment programs and they told him they’d never before been offered treatment medication.Doctors must become more comfortable treating addiction with medications, Hadland said, noting that buprenorphine and naltrexone are recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.Buprenorphine is given daily as a pill or film that dissolves under the tongue. It costs about $100 a month. Doctors need special training and a government waiver to prescribe it. A common version of buprenorphine is Suboxone.Vivitrol is a brand-name version of naltrexone. It’s a shot given once a month and can be used only with patients who have completely detoxed from opioids. It costs about $1,000 per month. All were diagnosed with opioid addiction, but only 27 percent were given buprenorphine or naltrexone during 2001-2014, years when addiction was soaring. Privacy Policy Associated Presscenter_img Newsletters Sign up for Morning Rounds Your daily dose of news in health and medicine. CHICAGO — Only 1 in 4 teens and young adults with opioid addiction receive recommended treatment medication despite having good health insurance, according to a study that suggests doctors are not keeping up with the needs of youth caught up in the worst addiction crisis in U.S. history.“Young people may be dying because they are not getting the treatment they need,” said Brendan Saloner, an addiction researcher at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who wrote an editorial published with the study Monday in JAMA Pediatrics.Researchers looked at records for nearly 21,000 patients ages 13 to 25 from one large insurance carrier, UnitedHealthcare.advertisement A new study finds only 1 in 4 teens and young adults with opioid addiction receive recommended treatment medication despite having good health insurance. Carla K. Johnson/AP HealthFew opioid-addicted youth get standard treatment medication Related: The drugs work slightly differently, but both can ease cravings while patients work on addiction issues in counseling.In the study, females, blacks and Hispanics were even less likely to receive the medications than males and whites. It’s unclear why, but unequal access to care or doctor bias could be to blame.“The treatment gap is bad for everybody and even worse for certain subgroups,” Hadland said. “Even though all the youth in our sample had access to high-quality health insurance, they may not have had equal access to high-quality addiction care.”Hadland and his colleagues plan to study access to treatment medications for youth from low-income families covered by government health insurance programs such as Medicaid.— Carla K. Johnson Tags opioidslast_img read more

NASA Archive Center At CU-Boulder To Carry Terra Spacecraft Data

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: April 20, 2000 The National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado at Boulder will soon be distributing information collected by the Terra satellite, NASA’s premier Earth Observing System spacecraft launched in December 1999.Terra is the first satellite to monitor how Earth’s atmosphere, land, ocean, snow and ice cover, solar radiation and life influence the planet on a daily, global scale, according to NASA officials. Carrying five instruments, Terra is giving scientists a comprehensive view of Earth as a system and monitoring its long-term health.One instrument, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, views the entire Earth surface every one to two days, gathering high-quality data in 36 spectral bands, many invisible to the human eye. The wide spectral range and high resolution will allow for the production of the most accurate global snow maps ever produced, said NSIDC researcher Greg Scharfen.”Since annual runoff from mountain snowpack contributes to streamflow and recharges groundwater over wide areas of the mid-latitudes — supplying water reserves for more than a billion people worldwide — snow maps are valuable in the short-term to water resource managers and planners,” said Sharfen. “In the long-term, consistent global records of snow and sea-ice extent are valuable to climate researchers. “Although the MODIS instrument will be a boon to scientists, the sheer volume of data generated poses a formidable challenge for archive centers like NSIDC, he said. “Preparations for ingesting and archiving the volumes of MODIS data have been underway here since 1990, as computer systems were ramped up to accept about eight gigabytes of data per day initially, and between 16 and 20 gigabytes per day under full production about a year from now,” said Sharfen. NSIDC will be able to deliver a like quantity of data to users per day, he said. One gigabyte equals about 1 billion bytes. For comparison purposes,, the entire second edition of Oxford English Dictionary made up of 20 volumes and 59 million words, takes up approximately 540 million bytes or 540 megabytes of electronic storage, he said. The Boulder facility is one of eight NASA data archives, each specializing in a particular science discipline. Only four of the NASA archives will house data from the Terra spacecraft. If all goes well, the Terra spacecraft is expected to download 190 gigabytes of data per day from all five instruments onboard.Snow and Ice data from MODIS are anticipated to be available beginning late summer 2000. For more information, see http://nsidc.org. The National Snow and Ice Data Center is part of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, a joint program of CU-Boulder and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.last_img read more

DPP Appeals For Facts Not Sensationalism

first_imgAdvertisements RelatedDPP Appeals For Facts Not Sensationalism DPP Appeals For Facts Not Sensationalism Office of the Prime MinisterAugust 11, 2010 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), Paula Llewellyn, has appealed to media practitioners and reporters to always seek to highlight the facts, without being sensational.Miss Llewellyn, who was addressing the recent installation ceremony of the Rotary Club of Christiana, in Manchester, noted that elements of transparency and integrity must not only be exhibited by public servants, but also by media personnel.“The media need to ensure that when reporting is done, the information provided will be disseminated to the public with utmost integrity and accuracy, utilising the highest professional standards,” the DPP said.“Journalists and the media need to be responsible, as they serve the public’s interest by being ‘watchdogs’ of officials, members of law enforcement and civil servants who wield political and economic power in society. We, in turn, should be careful of swallowing too much sensationalism, reading the headlines and forgetting to read the main body of the story, which sometimes is a stranger to the headline. We must not abandon critical thinking when we are absorbing information from the media,” she added.The DPP pointed out that the country has a liberal democratic political arrangement, which encourages free speech, and the very important role of informing and educating the public is supported by the freedom of expression provided by the Constitution.She said that when a good name is stained through the distribution of inaccuracies or misinformation, wittingly or unwittingly, by the media, even after remedial action or an apology is made, it cannot remove the stain.“Persons who act in the public’s interest and have the privilege of easy access to the media, should be guided by the highest level of professionalism, so as to act in the public’s interest. With these points of guidance in mind, they should ensure that they speak factually, responsibly and fairly. If in doubt about the veracity, one would hope that loose talk, innuendo and speculation should not be allowed to pass as facts, without it being made apparent that this may be someone’s opinion,” she argued.The DPP emphasised that freedom of the press is not a license to destroy other people’s reputation, and called on players in the media to ensure that Jamaica’s young democracy and constitutional rights guaranteed to its citizens be protected, where different groups work in the best interest of the public.“The use of innuendoes and loose words to malign fellow professionals who are doing their duty with integrity is unacceptable. For example, as DPP, if I were to make a ruling that a police officer be charged for a criminal offence without material on the file to support this charge, such decision would be a betrayal of my office and the public trust. I will always welcome criticism, but I would hope that an effort be made by the critic to be informed or to seek clarity in respect of any ruling that I have made, before running with an uninformed opinion to the media and the public,” she said.center_img RelatedDPP Appeals For Facts Not Sensationalism RelatedDPP Appeals For Facts Not Sensationalismlast_img read more

NWC Signs US$115 Million Contract with Scotia Bank to Improve Water Supply

first_imgNWC Signs US$115 Million Contract with Scotia Bank to Improve Water Supply EnvironmentDecember 16, 2011 By Latonya Linton, JIS Reporter RelatedNWC Signs US$115 Million Contract with Scotia Bank to Improve Water Supply RelatedNWC Signs US$115 Million Contract with Scotia Bank to Improve Water Supply FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail A contract valued at US$115 million was signed on December 15, 2011 between the National Water Commission (NWC) and the Bank of Nova Scotia for funding of the second phase of the Jamaica Water Supply Improvement Project (JWSIP). The contract was signed at the Ministry of Housing, Environment, Water and Local Government, in New Kingston. In his remarks, Minister of Housing, Environment, Water and Local Government, Hon. Dr. Horace Chang, noted that part of the objective of the NWC  is to not only improve efficiency and reliability, but to expand the facilities to ensure that urban Jamaica has a reliable and safe water supply. “It seems a very daunting task at the beginning, because that takes a significant amount of funding. In fact, I didn’t fully appreciate the cost of a water system until I got into the Ministry. It is far more expensive than most other infrastructure,” Dr. Chang argued. He noted that the US$115 loan from the Bank of Nova Scotia is the largest loan for infrastructure in Jamaica that is being organised by a local bank. “It is not the easiest thing to put together a loan of this size. The team persisted and the government is committed to making the National Water Commission a viable and efficient company,” Dr. Chang said.  “In addition to renegotiating this particular loan and a number of others, we had to demonstrate changes within the NWC that will ensure that the NWC will be able to repay these loans. It is essentially a commercial loan and we are a public company, backed by government guarantee, but the intention is that we cannot go back to the Consolidated Fund for funding,” he added.                                                                                                                                                            Dr. Chang further noted that, “not only did we have to look at water rates, but we had to look at the structural management of the Water Commission and we had taken steps to make changes that our financiers are satisfied that we are going in the right direction.” For his part, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Bank of Nova Scotia, Bruce Bowen, emphasized the importance of getting water to people, and that building the infrastructure of the country was something that attracted the bank to the project. “It was also being done in a manner that was going to be able to pay for itself and as a commercial financier, this is something that you are looking for,” Mr. Bowen said. Under the agreement with the bank, the principal loan will be repaid by the NWC by way of 18 equal quarterly instalments of US$1.916 million, following the 30-month moratorium period, with a final payment of US$80.5 million. There is also an interest rate of 5.80 per cent, per annum. The JWSIP, which is divided into segments A and B, is the single largest project ever undertaken by the NWC.  It has a total cost of $17 billion (US$211 million) and, on completion, will bring an additional 20 million gallons of water to residents in Kingston and St. Andrew, St. Catherine and other areas of Jamaica. RelatedNWC Signs US$115 Million Contract with Scotia Bank to Improve Water Supply Advertisementslast_img read more

China Unicom profit nearly triples as revenue rebounds

first_img Previous ArticleIBM warns AI rivals on data misuseNext ArticleBanks approach Airtel over Africa IPO options Tags Asia HomeAsiaNews China Unicom profit nearly triples as revenue rebounds Joseph Waring China operators lose NYSE delisting appeal Author ARPU gains boost China Unicom profitcenter_img Joseph Waring joins Mobile World Live as the Asia editor for its new Asia channel. Before joining the GSMA, Joseph was group editor for Telecom Asia for more than ten years. In addition to writing features, news and blogs, he… Read more Related China Unicom ends wait for 5G subscriber tally China Unicom, the second largest mobile operator in the country, reported a surge in profit in 2017 as service revenue and subscriber additions recovered from a weak 2016.The operator’s net profit jumped 192.5 per cent year-on-year to CNY1.83 billion ($289 million), which matched a profit alert it issued on 1 March. The company said excluding a CNY2.9 billion net loss on asset disposal related to a fibre network upgrade, its net profit would have increased 540.5 per cent year-on-year to CNY4 billion.Service revenue for 2017 rose 4.6 per cent year-on-year to CNY249 billion. Mobile service turnover rose 7.9 per cent to CNY156 billion, which the operator said exceeded the industry average by 2.2 percentage points.Wang Xiaochu, China Unicom’s chairman and CEO, said in a statement: “The company successfully turned around its operating results with significant improvement. A substantive breakthrough was made on mixed-ownership reform and the company saw fundamental improvement in operating results, marching a solid step forward towards its transformational development.”He said the company benefitted from the completion of a capital injection deliverd by the implementation of the mixed-ownership reform, which strengthened its balance sheet substantially.A 41.6 per cent year-on-year reduction in capex to CNY42.13 billion also helped its bottom-line. Despite the decrease, the operator managed to add 110,000 4G base stations last year to take its total to 850,000. Its overall mobile subscriber base rose 2.7 per cent to 284 million at end 2017: 4G subcribers increased 67 per cent to 175 million. Mobile ARPU increased 3.5 per cent year-on-year to CNY48. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 15 MAR 2018 China Unicomearningslast_img read more

Apple developers opting-out of privacy features

first_imgHome Apple developers opting-out of privacy features Previous ArticleGoogle enhances Pay architectureNext ArticleJapanese operators focusing on partnerships for 5G AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 06 JUN 2019 Steve Costello Apple targets Chinese apps over iOS privacy loophole Español Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more Relatedcenter_img Author Developers have shunned features provided in iOS to ensure data privacy, research by mobile security company Wandera showed.A study of 30,000 iOS apps commonly used by employees found more than two-thirds do not use Apple’s App Transport Security (ATS), which ensures apps and their extensions connect to web services using secure connection protocols.While ATS is enabled by default and Apple’s app review guidelines state developers must justify disabling it, Wandera said its research showed this process is not onerous.It noted developers may have good reasons for disabling ATS, for example enabling connection to third-party advertising, market research, analytics and file hosting: advertising networks MoPub and Google AdMob recommend disabling ATS to ensure ads load correctly.But developers do have the option to set ATS exceptions for specific functions within an app, meaning it is not a straight off/on choice, though this is not a common approach.With ad networks being one of the reasons for disabling ATS, Wandera noted it is unsurprising its use is significantly higher in paid-for apps: it is enabled in 45.9 per cent of cases, rather than 26.2 per cent for free titles.Finance is the leading category in terms of ATS compatibility, but Wandera noted that even among the leading apps in the segment, only a third enable it for global use and many still have exception domains.CausesWandera suggested developers may be disabling ATS because “they don’t actually understand how it works due to its complexity”. Another possibility is they are “taking the easy way out” by submitting all domains needed by apps as exceptions to avoid possible disruption to users.It also noted web service companies can become part of the solution. “They can’t keep supporting unencrypted content when OS vendors like Apple are trying to move toward total encryption”, it said. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Las asociaciones del sector respaldan el acuerdo sobre privacidad de la Unión Europea Tags Facebook to pay $650M in privacy settlement iOSPrivacyWanderalast_img read more

Premium / Supply chain radar: DSV’s Andersen steals limelight from DHL’s Scharwath in air cargo gongs – fair?

first_img“’Andersen’s leadership of DSV through its acquisition of and merger with Panalpina led the readers and editors of Air Cargo World to recognise him as the Air Cargo Executive of the Year for 2019.’ So begins Air Cargo World’s article showcasing this year’s Air Cargo Executive of the Year.” – DSV Panalpina, 4 December.I never thought I would find myself having to comment on the announcement of “Air Cargo Executive of the Year” – I have yet to decide whether … Password* Premium subscriber LOGIN LOGIN Please either REGISTER or login below to continue Email* By Alessandro Pasetti 04/12/2019 Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium << Go back Reset Your Password Email* Please Login New Premium subscriber REGISTER Reset Forgotten your password? Please click herelast_img read more

SteamSpy creator warns PC market is once again open to abuse

first_imgSteamSpy creator warns PC market is once again open to abuse“Imagine signing a basketball player without knowing his past performance,” posits Sergey GalyonkinJames BatchelorEditor-in-ChiefThursday 12th April 2018Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleValveThe sudden loss of SteamSpy was a massive shock for most users – but not for its creator.Sergey Galyonkin, Epic Games’ director of publishing strategy, started the site as a side project back in 2015, and it soon became an invaluable resource for developers and publishers around the world. It was always assumed that Valve was unhappy about Steam sales data being estimated so openly – and largely accurately – but it never seemed to make any direct move to counter-act it.Yet an unannounced change in this week’s update to Steam’s privacy settings cut off a primary stream of data, spelling the end for SteamSpy.Sergey Galyonkin, SteamSpy”I was surprised that Valve allowed it to operate for almost three years. I knew at some point they would shut it down,” Galyonkin tells GamesIndustry.biz.”It’s not usually the sort of company to cave to external pressure, but Valve has been making changes over the past year that have affected SteamSpy. I was always able to adapt, and even in this case I still have enough information to extrapolate the data, but with less precision and a higher margin for error.”This doesn’t leave us completely in the dark, but visibility has been significantly impaired given the cost of the alternatives – unfathomably for many of indie developers and publishers, which rely on Steam as a major market.”You can order surveys from any number of companies who do all this stuff, but that might be $50,000 to $100,000 depending on how much you want to cover and the precision you want, and that process will take several months,” Galyonkin observes. “As a big company, like EA-size, you can still do that and companies I’ve worked for have never shied away from paying that sort of money for accessible information. Obviously as an indie, you could spare $30 per month for SteamSpy subscription, but you can’t spare $100,000 to research any given game in the market. You can’t take six months on that survey because you have a game to develop and bills to pay.”It’s here that the impact of SteamSpy’s closure becomes clear, particularly for smaller, less cash-rich companies. Preventing the site from continuing its analysis has demolished the level playing field it was attempting to create, making it riskier for ambitious developers to disrupt the market with new ideas and innovative games.Galyonkin insists it’s still possible to analyse market trends based on the information available without costly third-party services, but it will, “be harder, and take way more time than before.” “I still have enough information to extrapolate the data, but with less precision and a higher margin for error” “SteamSpy removed the information asymmetry that people abused previously,” he says. “In any market, if you have information asymmetry, it’s bad for some of the parties that engage in any market transaction. Imagine buying a house without knowing the price of the house. Imagine signing a contract with a basketball player without knowing their performance in past games.”The loss of SteamSpy speaks to wider concerns in the industry – something we’ve addressed this morning. Digital data is becoming essential to making informed business decisions in order to ensure a company’s survival and grow the industry. Yet Valve and even the biggest publishers remain determined to withhold this information – presumably out of fear that it gives their competitors an advantage, or would prevent them from appeasing shareholders. “I guess it’s a ‘show me yours, I’ll show you mine’ kind of situation, only with tens of thousands of companies in the market,” says Galyonkin on the likelihood that anything could replace SteamSpy. “That’s really hard to co-ordinate. “SteamSpy was acting like an independent agent that was easily verifiable. People trusted SteamSpy because you could always use the same algorithm and verify that the data was correct. That created a situation where I know some publishers were not exactly happy with SteamSpy, but it felt fair for everyone.”Independent publishers and developers have been remarkably open about how much they used SteamSpy – not as the sole basis for their strategies, but certainly as a significant factor. Given that this all started as a side project, did this add pressure to Galyonkin to ensure SteamSpy was accurate? Was he comfortable with how many business-breaking decisions might be based on his analysis?”I did it precisely because I wanted people to be able to make informed decisions,” he says. “I used to work as an industry analyst, now I’m a head of publishing strategy, and most of the decisions we make are based on data.””SteamSpy removed the information asymmetry that people abused previously… Imagine signing a contract with a basketball player without knowing their performance in past games.” It’s hard not to reiterate how little data there is in the market – not just on PC but on consoles, too. Yes, digital projects by NPD and ISFE are making some headway, but the industry still seems partly reliant on increasingly outdated retail charts. With the biggest blockbusters now selling between a third and half of all their copies digitally, it’s impossible to gain an accurate understanding of the market by looking at the weekly or monthly Top 10.”And boxed charts tend to skew towards single-player titles,” Galyonkin adds. “Fortnite isn’t even visible in the retail sales.”The thing with consoles is, if you’re a game developer and you’re bigger than the smallest indie, the platform holders will actually share some information with you. They would make a prediction of sales you could expect, regional distribution or which languages you should pay attention to and localise for. At least in my experience, both Microsoft and Sony have been really helpful in providing information that can be used to make informed decisions. They don’t provide as much as SteamSpy, but they do share information. Valve doesn’t, unfortunately.”The privacy update that necessitated these changes – and, by extension, the death of SteamSpy – seems to be based on protecting users’ sensitive information, although Galyonkin remains somewhat sceptical given how specific a move this has been.”There are real concerns about people’s personal data being exposed – we know this from all the Facebook stuff,” he acknowledges. “So obviously if Valve is looking into that, it’s absolutely the right decision. Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games “It’s just in this particular case they chose to hide played games without hiding other information by default, which makes me wonder why they did that. If you want to comply with GDPR, you have to hide everything – not just games.”As mentioned, Galyonkin believes there is a way to continue analysing Steam data – but not to a sufficient standard for him to justify running SteamSpy. That doesn’t mean he’s finished with crunching Valve’s numbers.”Based on the information still available from Steam, I could actually write algorithms to use learnings based on previous data and on data that’s still available to extrapolate marketing trends and look at data in games, smaller games,” he says. “Obviously the problem is the bigger margin of error, so if I choose to do that – if I have time, of course, given that I still have Fortnite to run – I will probably not expose it to anyone. Because it will be way harder to use if you don’t have any understanding of how statistics work.”Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Publishing & Retail newsletter and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesWolfire Games files antitrust lawsuit against ValveThe developer argues that Valve uses its dominant position on the PC market to “exploit publishers and consumers”By Marie Dealessandri 12 days agoValve blocks Super Seducer 3 from SteamMultiple product reviews left Valve at “an impasse” with seduction game creator Richard LeRuinaBy Matthew Handrahan A month agoLatest comments (1)Richard Browne Head of External Projects, Digital Extremes3 years ago I just want to say a huge thank you to Sergey for doing this project over the years. Its invaluable and fascinating and has been the most wonderful tool for the development community. 2Sign inorRegisterto rate and replySign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

Indian EPC Sterling and Wilson hopes to deliver 250 MW of solar power in Nigeria

first_imgIndian EPC Sterling and Wilson hopes to deliver 250 MW of solar power in NigeriaThe developer is currently in discussions with international solar PV developers to build up to 250 MW of solar capacity in Nigeria over the next two-to-three years following a recent push in the country to get 975 MW online. July 20, 2016 Ian Clover Installations Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share Indian EPC Sterling and Wilson is looking to develop up to 250 MW of capacity after international solar project developers recently signed 975 MW of power purchase agreements (PPAs) with the Nigerian Bulk Electricity Trading (BNET) Plc under Nigeria’s FIT program. Sterling and Wilson said it was in advanced negotiations with the developers to offer its turnkey EPC solutions for their proposed projects in Nigeria. The PPAs, agreed earlier this month in one of the first tangible signs of activity in Nigeria’s large-scale solar sector, will see government-owned NBET snap up the solar power produced for a price of $0.115/kWh. For its part, Sterling and Wilson hopes to build up to 250 MW of commissioned projects in the next two to three years to add to its growing 1 GW portfolio of completed solar parks globally. The Indian developer has a 260 MW clean energy pipeline in Egypt, 175 MW in Morocco, 87 MW in South Africa and 7 MW in Niger, so is well positioned to continue to serve Africa’s growing clean energy appetite. It also has a completed 90 MW solar farm in South Africa under its belt, the company confirmed. “With the recently announced PPAs of 975 MW, we see huge solar potential opening up in Nigeria,” said Sterling and Wilson’s solar business president Bikesh Ogra. “We are well positioned to support growth in the solar market in Nigeria through our presence and experience, as more investors are focusing on reliable, bankable solar EPCs that can commission projects on time.” Yesterday, Nigeria’s government signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Nigus Greenergy and Volt Renewables for the creation of three 100 MW solar PV plants in three of the country’s northern states. This article was updated on Aug. 8, 2016.Popular content Submarine cable to connect 10.5 GW wind-solar complex in Morocco to the UK grid Emiliano Bellini 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com UK-based Xlinks is planning to build 10.5 GW of wind and solar in Morocco and sell the power generated by the huge plant in the UK. This should be ma… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. In the Europea… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… iAbout these recommendations Share Ian Clover Ian joined the pv magazine team in 2013 and specializes in power electronics (inverters) and battery storage. Ian also reports on the UK solar market, having worked as a print and web journalist in Britain for various multimedia companies, covering topics ranging from renewable energy and sustainability to real estate, sport and film.More articles from Ian Clover [email protected] Related content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Orig… Solar and wind could provide half of 2040 power mix across 22 African nations Max Hall 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The International Renewable Energy Agency has combined energy infrastructure commitments across a huge swathe of the con… Indian state of Maharashtra tenders 1.3 GW solar for agriculture Uma Gupta 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Developers have until May 17 to bid for grid-connected, ground-mounted PV capacity that will come up across 29 districts… EU to offer expertise to drive renewables-friendly policy across Africa Cosmas Mwirigi 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The oft-heard industry call for more supportive policy for renewables, this time in Africa, has prompted the European Co… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. The weekend read: China’s push for decarbonization Andreas Walstad 24 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The carbon market is finally a reality in China. After 10 years of delays, regional pilot schemes and general uncertaint… iAbout these recommendations Elsewhere on pv magazine… Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… 123456Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. Any other transfer to third parties will not take place unless this is justified on the basis of applicable data protection regulations or if pv magazine is legally obliged to do so.You may revoke this consent at any time with effect for the future, in which case your personal data will be deleted immediately. Otherwise, your data will be deleted if pv magazine has processed your request or the purpose of data storage is fulfilled.Further information on data privacy can be found in our Data Protection Policy.iAbout these recommendationsKeep up to date pv magazine Global offers daily updates of the latest photovoltaics news. We also offer comprehensive global coverage of the most important solar markets worldwide. Select one or more editions for targeted, up to date information delivered straight to your inbox.Email* Select Edition(s)*Hold Ctrl or Cmd to select multiple editions.Tap to select multiple editions.Global (English, daily)Germany (German, daily)U.S. (English, daily)Australia (English, daily)China (Chinese, weekly)India (English, daily)Latin America (Spanish, daily)Brazil (Portuguese, weekly)Mexico (Spanish, daily)Spain (Spanish, daily)France (French, daily)We send newsletters with the approximate frequency outlined for each edition above, with occasional additional notifications about events and webinars. We measure how often our emails are opened, and which links our readers click. To provide a secure and reliable service, we send our email with MailChimp, which means we store email addresses and analytical data on their servers. You can opt out of our newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of every mail. For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Virtual Roundtables USA 17 November 2020 pv-magazine.com We will be hosting the second edition of our successful Virtual Roundtables this year in November. The program will be f… Out with the old… A guide to successful inverter replacement , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRoberto Arana-Gonzalez, Service Sales Manager EMEA, SungrowFranco Marino, Regional Service Mana… Reducing solar project risk for extreme weather 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsDaniel H.S. Chang, VP of Business Development | RETCGreg Beardsworth, Sr. Director of Product M… iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print ESG criteria: Should developers take notice? Michael Fuhs 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Something is brewing in the financial world. “Sustainable finance” and the growth of ESG funds have been taking the mark… Flexible tools for the next generation Jonathan Gifford 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com A solar manufacturing investment cycle appears to be underway in Europe, with equipment suppliers reporting surging leve… When quality meets quantity Jonathan Gifford 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As 2021 progresses, the signs of it being (yet another) banner year for PV deployment become clearer. An increasing numb… Strong growth ahead for storage pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Annual battery storage installations will exceed 10 GW/28 GWh in 2021, following a particularly strong year in 2020, des… The feasibility of India’s auctions Uma Gupta 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The offtaker’s creditworthiness, the ease of land acquisition, infrastructure readiness, policy consistency and clarity,… Curtailing corrosion: making mounting structures last pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Raw material quality is vital for solar power plants, particularly given higher expectations for their lifetimes, as 30+… iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

‘Perception: Real or Forced?’

first_imgOne day during our lecture of psychology, our professor asked us about perception .. means what is perception? Why does it matter? What’s it show? Everything about perception.. we all tend to love debate so it was him versus us. We started giving our opinion about perception like perception means your point of view about something or way of looking and making opinions of some issues etcetera…Then after losing all our energy our professor smiled and said all the things which we had said are true but he asked one thing which baffled us. The question was this: do you have your own perception?This time, we couldn’t answer the question. We were speechless. He again gave us a smile and said, “ that’s something I wanted to hear but there is no answer to it. You see different factors like social media, broadcast media, newspapers, others opinions affect our perception because these are the sources of information. We are totally dependent on them. They mould our perceptions and our opinions” after this he said “ now don’t ask me about my perception, I am in the same situation as you!” we all laughed and the lecture ended.This debate forced me to think about my perception and how my opinion depends upon it. I am not an expert in this. But we all need to think about this: what is our real perception?last_img read more