More Talgo work for RENFE

first_imgSPAIN: RENFE’s Integria rolling stock maintenance business is to build Talgo rolling stock for other operators under an agreement signed with the train builder on June 16. Running for a term of 14 years from 2009, the agreement should guarantee 1 150 000 h of work for the Integria sites at Valladolid and Málaga, which will be responsible for mechanical and electrical assembly, painting, inspection and testing.As part of an order for 10 gauge-changing trainsets for overnight services placed by RENFE with Talgo in 2005 (RG 7.05 p395), the Integria workshops at Málaga have rolled out the first of five formations that they will assemble. Capable of operating at up to 220 km/h, each 10-car trainset has a total of 98 sleeping berths and 136 reclining seats, as well as restaurant car and a bar car. They are to be deployed first on routes from Barcelona to Cádiz and Málaga, followed in 2009 by services to Granada, Gijón and Galicia.Málaga is also producing seven Class 130 gauge-changing trainsets (14 power cars and 77 trailers) as well as 14 Class 112 sets (28 power cars and 168 trailers). A total of 30 Class 112 and 16 Class 102 trainsets are to be maintained by the Tarvia joint venture of RENFE< and Talgo (which owns 49%), due to commence operations at the start of 2009.last_img read more

Seward Joins National Project to Raise Awareness

first_imgThere are no additional plans for the wall this summer but some regularly scheduled Seward activites may include it. McDivitt: “To raise awareness actually on underage drinking and drug use, domestic violence and suicide, alcohol related accidents, bullying and stuff like that and we’re asking people before they make comments on the wall what they want to do before they die to keep in mind the people who have been lost to those different addictions and battles they faced everyday.” FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享An eight by twelve wall has been installed in Seward’s Harbor as part of a national project which invites people to reflect on their lives and bring awareness to a variety of social issues. The “Before I Die” walls are part of a national project that was created in New Orleans by artist Candy Chang who created the first wall on an abandoned house in her neighborhood after losing a loved one and going through a deep depression. The wall was installed at 1:30 pm on Monday and by 6:30 pm the wall of 70 plus lines was full. McDivitt said the huge response was all positive.center_img The walls are black with the phrase “Before I die I want to *blank*” stenciled on repeatedly and more than 200 walls have sprung up in over 15 languages and in over 40 countries, including Kazakhstan, Argentina, China, Italy, Israel, Thailand, and South Africa.McDivitt partnered with Seward Prevention Coalition Coordinator Katie Cornwell and Lt. Doreen Valadez of the Seward Police Department to contact the project, order the kit, and create the space. McDivitt: “We’re really excited that it’s taken hold like this and embraced it, we’re going to try to get out this week and try to interview some people putting comments on the wall to try to get their opinions on it.” Dawn McDivitt is the Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Coordinator at SeaView Community Services in Seward.last_img read more

Passover vacation niche grows to dozens of destinations

first_img In this April 18, 2016 photo, a hotel kitchen worker chops vegetables in preparation for the Passover holiday at the Waldorf Astoria resort at Disney World in Orlando, Fla. More than 1,000 Jews are expected to stay at the resort and take part in the eight day celebration. (AP Photo/John Raoux) In this April 18, 2016 photo, a kitchen worker walks past boxes of food that will be used for the Passover holiday at the Waldorf Astoria resort at Disney World in Orlando, Fla. More than 1,000 Jews are expected to stay at the resort and take part in the eight day celebration. (AP Photo/John Raoux) ORLANDO, Fla. | Most Jews around the world say the traditional “Next year in Jerusalem” at the end of the annual Passover Seder feast. Last year, St. Louis native David Benkof said to himself, “Next year in Disney World.”For many Jews like Benkof, traveling to vacation hotspots during the eight-day Passover holiday has become a way of avoiding the hassle of heeding religious rules that require scrubbing a home clean of grain particles or hosting back-to-back, hours-long dinners at their homes for dozens of relatives and friends. In this April 18, 2016 photo, workers prepare food in a meat-only kitchen for the Passover holiday at the Waldorf Astoria resort at Disney World in Orlando, Fla. More than 1,000 Jews are expected to stay at the resort and take part in the eight day celebration. (AP Photo/John Raoux) Passover vacations have grown in recent years beyond the traditional destinations of Miami Beach, the Catskills and Israel. They now include scores of resorts in Orlando, Florida; Scottsdale, Arizona; Riviera Maya in Mexico; Whistler, Canada; Sardinia, Italy; the island of Crete in Greece; San Diego; and Puerto Rico, as well as a fully-kosher South African safari.“We’ve seen a massive growth over the last decade to 12 years of the locations, the variety, the price ranges, the types of hotels,” said Ralphi Bloom, who runs Totally Jewish Travel, a travel website.Bloom estimates that up to 50,000 hotel rooms for as many as 100,000 people are booked this year for Passover, which starts at sundown Friday. That represents about $60 million to $70 million in revenue, double the amount from a decade ago, he said.Passover travel programs at the resorts, which include Ritz-Carlton and Waldorf Astoria hotels in Florida, are accommodating the celebrants with kids’ camps, casino nights, Hawaiian luaus, daily barbecues, lectures by rabbinic scholars and meals that follow kosher dietary rules of separating milk from meat and prohibiting pork and shellfish, along with Passover prohibitions against bread.“People are more willing to not have the traditional Passover at home and actually go away, with the ability to make hotel kitchens kosher, source food locally that is kosher,” said Bloom, who is based in Manchester, England. “I think in more and more families both the husband and the wife work. When you go away for Passover … there’s no cleaning, preparing, cooking.”Benkof spent the last few days of Passover last year at the Doubletree by Hilton Orlando at SeaWorld, but he missed the first two nights when Jews have the traditional Seder meal. He plans to arrive in time for the Seder dinners this year. Food was a selling point: Some Passover food can be dry and flavorless but the resort served delicious meals.Observant Jews don’t eat leavened grain products during the eight days of Passover because the holiday commemorates the Biblical story of Exodus, when Jews fleeing slavery in Egypt didn’t have time to let their bread rise. They took instead flat, hard unleavened bread that today is sold as matzo. Passover dietary rules forbid consumption of certain grain-based foods like bread and pasta that puffs up when cooked.Benkof said the food at the resort hands-down beat the matzo and gefilte fish he would eat if he stayed home.“I went to the theme parks during the day and ate myself crazy at night,” said Benkof, who is paying about $4,500 for an all-inclusive package. “What is remarkable about the food is how much there is, lots of it. They had bread! It was kosher for Passover bread, but you couldn’t tell it was Passover food.”Depending on the hotel and destination, prices for Passover vacation packages range from $1,600 to $11,000 per person, and typically cover lodging, unlimited food and entertainment.Many tour operators hosting Passover vacations bring in their own rabbis and staff to make the resorts Passover-ready. They also bring in Passover-only dishes, utensils and cookware that are untouched by grain products. Utensils or dishes that aren’t used specifically for Passover must be immersed in boiling water. Stoves and ovens are cleaned for Passover by heating at full blast for one or two hours. Cupboards, refrigerators and freezers are scrubbed clean of any crumbs and residue. Sinks are cleaned with boiling water.“There is a tremendous amount of work that goes into making a kitchen kosher,” said Alan Berger, who is running the Grand Getaways Passover vacations.Berger’s company is hosting 1,000 people for 10 days at the Waldorf Astoria at Walt Disney World. His staff and caterers are taking over a hotel ballroom kitchen for the week.“There’s no ‘almost kosher’ for Passover. It either is or isn’t,” he said.At some resorts, sex-segregated swimming sessions are held at resort pools in deference to ultra-Orthodox Jews concerned about modesty requirements. Conference rooms are converted into makeshift synagogues for prayer services. There are also concerts, performances by mentalists and illusionists and, of course, a “tea room” where guests can nosh on sweets and snacks all day.“We’re constantly keeping everybody stuffed to the gills,” Berger said. “We try to entertain people at all times.”Follow Mike Schneider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/mikeschneiderap In this April 18, 2016 photo, a kitchen worker carries a box of Kosher salt that will be used for the Passover holiday at the Waldorf Astoria resort at Disney World in Orlando, Fla. More than 1,000 Jews are expected to stay at the resort and take part in the eight day celebration. (AP Photo/John Raoux) In this April 18, 2016 photo, beef ribs on a tray await preparation for the Passover holiday at the Waldorf Astoria resort at Disney World in Orlando, Fla. More than 1,000 Jews are expected to stay at the resort and take part in the eight day celebration. (AP Photo/John Raoux) In this April 18, 2016 photo, boxes of matzos are stacked in the kitchen for the Passover holiday at the Waldorf Astoria resort at Disney World in Orlando, Fla. More than 1,000 Jews are expected to stay at the resort and take part in the eight day celebration. (AP Photo/John Raoux) In this April 18, 2016 photo, Rabbi Raphael Berdugo checks parsley for insects as part of the preparation for the Passover holiday at the Waldorf Astoria resort at Disney World in Orlando, Fla. More than 1,000 Jews are expected to stay at the resort and take part in the eight day celebration. (AP Photo/John Raoux)last_img read more