Brian Conley to Play Ebenezer Scrooge in the West End’s A Christmas Carol This Season

first_imgBrian Conley as Ebenezer Scrooge in “A Christmas Carol” (Photo: c/o Storyhouse PR) London audiences are going to be feeling tidings of comfort and joy this holiday season because Alan Menken, Lynn Ahrens and Mike Ockrent’s A Christmas Carol is coming back to the stage. Olivier nominee Brian Conley will star as Ebenezer Scrooge in this staged concert at the West End’s Dominion Theatre. The limited engagement will run from December 7, 2020 to January 2, 2021. Shaun Kerrison is set to direct.Based on the Charles Dickens classic, this A Christmas Carol first premiered in 1994 at New York’s Paramount Theatre and ran for a decade at Madison Square Garden.Conley has appeared on the West End stage in Me and My Girl, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, Hairspray, Oliver!, The Music Man, Barnum and Jolson, which earned him an Olivier Award nomination. In 1995, he received the prestigious National Television Award for Most Popular Comedy Performer.Covid safety measures and social distancing will be in place front of house, on stage, backstage and throughout the Dominion Theatre. The production is also offering 900 free tickets to key workers and their families.This production of A Christmas Carol is not to be confused with Jack Thorne’s adaptation, which recently announced it will be livstreaming from London’s Old Vic Theater this season prior to returning to Broadway next year.The new musical The Prince of Egypt, which was playing at the Old Dominion Theater at the time of the theater shutdown, will resume its run in the spring 2021 pending U.K. government advice. View Commentslast_img read more

HUUB in exclusive partnership with Swim Serpentine

first_imgHUUB Design has announced an exclusive partnership with Swim Serpentine, the new two-day open water swimming festival that will be staged in the heart of London over the weekend of 24-25 September 2016.The multiple award-winning wetsuit and triathlon apparel manufacturer will provide wetsuits, swimwear and swim accessories to all participants looking to hire or purchase equipment for the event.All swimmers in the mass-participation mile must wear either a wetsuit or use a tow-float.HUUB founder and managing director Dean Jackson said, “We’re extremely excited to be part of such a unique event, giving swimmers of all levels the opportunity to swim an open water mile at such an iconic location.”Launched by London Marathon Events to raise money for charities and provide a platform for developing elite British swimming talent, Swim Serpentine will give up to 6000 swimmers the chance to swim one mile in open water at the Serpentine in Hyde Park – the venue for the open water swimming competition at the London 2012 Olympic Games.Winner of Best Tri Wetsuit Brand of the Year from 2013 to 2016 at the 220 Triathlon Awards, HUUB’s wetsuit and apparel ranges continue to expand internationally. The brand is sported by top triathlon names including Olympic medallists Alistair and Jonathan Brownlee, as well as two-time ITU World Champion Helen Jenkins.www.swimserpentine.co.ukwww.huubdesign.com Relatedlast_img read more

Returning travelers cause sizable malaria burden in US

first_imgOver a recent 15-year period, close to 1,500 US travelers a year were hospitalized for treatment of malaria acquired overseas, far more than were treated for other travel-related diseases, according to a study published yesterday on the eve of World Malaria Day.In related news, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced yesterday that a pilot program for administering the world’s first malaria vaccine to young children will be conducted in Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi starting next year.Imported cases cost $555 millionMalaria transmission in the United States was stopped in the 1950s, but a steady stream of travelers are bringing the disease home with them, suggesting that many travelers are not taking adequate precautions, according to the study published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (AJTMH).Researchers looked for malaria cases in hospitalization discharge records in the 2000 to 2014 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, according to the report. They estimated there were 22,029 malaria-related hospitalizations over the 15 years, or 4.88 per million population, with 4,823 severe cases and 182 in-hospital deaths.”It appears more and more Americans are traveling to areas where malaria is common and many of them are not taking preventive measures, such as using anti-malarial preventive medications and mosquito repellents, even though they are very effective at preventing infections,” Diana Khuu, PhD, MPH, lead author of the study, said in an AJTMH news release. She is a scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles.The findings showed that malaria-linked hospitalizations, averaging 1,489 per year, were far more common than hospitalizations for most other travel-related diseases, according to the release. For example, dengue fever, which is common in Latin America, accounted for 259 hospitalizations per year over the same period.The malaria patients were hospitalized for an average of 4.36 days, at an average cost of $25,789, the report said. The total cost of the cases over the 15 years came to about $555 million.The burden fell disproportionately on patients who were male, black, or 25 to 44 years old, the study found. Plasmodium falciparum malaria—the most deadly type—accounted for most of the hospitalizations, and August was the month with the most cases.Since about 69% of all malaria patients need hospital treatment, the scientists estimated that about 2,100 people in the United States have malaria each year, according to the release.Khuu commented that mosquitoes capable of carrying malaria are common in parts of the United States, and that increases in the number of travelers coming home with the disease increase the risk of re-establishing the disease in the country. But the study found no significant change in the rate of malaria hospitalizations over the study period.Malaria vaccinations planned in AfricaMeanwhile, plans to give the new malaria vaccine, called RTS,S, to children in parts of Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi were announced yesterday by the WHO’s Regional Office for Africa. The vaccine was developed to protect young children from P falciparum malaria.The pilot program will assess whether the vaccine’s protective effect in children 5 to 17 months old, shown in phase 3 testing, can be replicated in real life, the WHO said. Specifically, the program will test the feasibility of delivering the required four doses of RTS,S, the vaccine’s potential role in reducing childhood deaths, and its safety in routine use.WHO officials describe the vaccine as a complementary tool that could be added to the core package of WHO-recommended measures for preventing malaria, including insecticide-treated bed nets, spraying indoor walls with insecticides, and preventive medicines for pregnant women and young children.Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi were chosen for the program because they have high coverage with treated bed nets, good malaria and immunization programs, high malaria burdens, and participation in the RTS,S phase 3 trials, the WHO said.RTS,S was developed by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and is the first malaria vaccine to succeed in a phase 3 trial, the WHO noted. In 2015, two WHO advisory groups recommended pilot vaccination programs in three to five settings in sub-Saharan Africa.Several non-governmental global health agencies are partnering to provide $49.2 million for the first phase of the pilot program (2017 to 2020), which will be complemented by in-kind contributions from the WHO and GSK, the WHO said.WHO cites progress, challengesIn other malaria news, the WHO yesterday reported progress and big remaining challenges in the battle against the disease. The agency said the rate of new malaria cases fell by 21% globally from 2010 to 2015, and death rates fell by 29% in the same 5-year period. In sub-Saharan Africa, which bears 90% of the malaria burden, cases and death rates fell by 21% and 31%, respectively.Still, in 2015 the global malaria toll was 429,000 deaths and 212 million new cases, with one child dying from malaria every 2 minutes, the WHO said.The agency’s long-term malaria strategy calls for reducing cases and deaths by 90% and eliminating the disease in at least 35 countries by 2030. Interim 2020 targets call for 40% reductions in cases and death rates and for eliminating malaria in at least 10 countries.Funds for malaria prevention, researchOther malaria news related to World Malaria Day included announcements about grants for malaria prevention and research:The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria said today it would provide more than $242 million over 3 years to continue the battle against malaria in Cambodia, Thailand, Myanmar, Laos, and Vietnam. The grant will be the group’s largest regional allocation and the first with the specific goal of eliminating the disease in a specific region. The step continues the fund’s Regional Artemisinin-resistance Initiative, launched in 2013.The US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) announced late last week it would provide about $9 million in first-year funding for seven malaria research centers around the world. The awards will go to three new and four existing centers that work in 14 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The 7-year awards continue NIAID’s 2010 program that created the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) in regions where malaria is endemic.See also:Arp 24 AJTMH abstractApr 24 AJTMH press releaseApr 24 WHO-Africa press release on vaccination programApr 24, 2015, CIDRAP News story “First malaria vaccine shows promise despite efficacy drop-off”Oct 23, 2015, CIDRAP News story “WHO experts urge gradual rollout of malaria vaccine”Apr 24 WHO press release on malaria progress and challengeslast_img read more

Outdoor Dining Hearing Closed

first_imgA public hearing allowing small take-out restaurants to add up to 16 sidewalk seats as part of East Hampton Town’s Downtown Montauk Outdoor Dining Right-of-Way Pilot Program closed at the town board’s meeting last Thursday.Under the program, the fire marshal’s office would review the locations of tables, making sure passersby have enough room to walk, and approve a permit to the tune of $150.“We know everyone likes to dine outside during the summer, so we hope this makes it good for businesses, and makes it clear for code enforcement,” said Councilwoman Sylvia Overby, who is the board’s liaison to the Montauk Citizens Advisory Committee.Springs resident David Buda questioned whether there were any provisions within the program to protect against any litter generated from the takeout restaurants.Overby said there aren’t any provisions in the proposed program, but there are in the town code. She said she believed the businesses, Montauk Chamber of Commerce, and the town could work together to ensure litter does not get out of hand.The chamber has installed trash cans for recyclables, which are sponsored by local businesses, and the town has been picking the refuse up, Overby said.“Always, litter is a problem,” she added.The proposal came out of the town’s business committee. It’s the third part of the pilot program legislation, which first made it possible for restaurants to have outdoor dining, then was followed by a provision allowing smaller takeout restaurants to have 16 seats in their establishments.In other Montauk news, the board moved forward with plans to pursue temporary housing for seasonal workers in Montauk. The town is sending out a request for proposals, which will be due back by July 31. A pre-proposal meeting will be held on May 9. The idea behind the project is to provide affordable local housing for the hamlet’s seasonal workforce, which would also reduce the amount of congestion on the roadways in the summer season.The board approved $150,000 in funding for the Hampton Hopper to run a shuttle bus in Montauk for the summer season. The cost will be offset by a $100,000 in state grant funding set aside by Assemblyman Fred Thiele.The Ditch Witch was approved once again as the town’s mobile concessionaire for Otis Road at Ditch Plains Beach. The bid came in at $12,825.Also, at the town board meeting:• The board scheduled public hearings on the acquisition of properties under the Community Preservation Fund. The properties included 105 Sycamore Drive, Springs for $290,000 and 269 Fairview Avenue, Montauk for $585,000, respectively.• Christine Ganitsch was appointed to the CPF Advisory Board.• Oyster gardening fees for the East Hampton Shellfish Education and Enhancement Directive were set at $250 for first-year oyster gardeners and $150 per year thereafter. The fee will entitle oyster gardeners access to oyster growing gear, assistance from the town’s shellfish hatchery staff, and oyster seed in order to maintain their crop of 1000 oysters as determined by New York State.The town’s hatchery will also assist oyster gardeners who would like to cultivate oysters off their own docks for an initial fee of $350, under the assumption that the farmer would keep the gear used to grow oysters. The farmers would also have to obtain a license to collect shellfish from the state Department of Environmental Conservation.Subsequent sustaining member fees would be $100 and would entitle the gardener an annual allotment of new oyster seed in order to maintain their state allotment of [email protected] Sharelast_img read more