TPE15: Pro-Lite lightens up w/ new Antero Carbon XC/Cyclocross wheels, road disc coming

first_imgA small shelf supports the tire bead for tubeless setup. Wheelset weights come in at about 1,495g (27.5”) and 1,595g (29er).The hub uses an 11-speed ready freehub body, which comes in handy since the same internal setup will be used for their upcoming wider, tubeless ready Cicilia road wheels. Those will have an inside width of 19mm, 23.8mm external and be 21mm tall. A Disc brake version of that will follow this month.Not shown, the new alloy VLR Triathlon frame, which they say is popular in Europe and Australia, gets a slightly slacker headtube than the carbon version to make it a little more accessible for beginners not ready for the super sharp handling of a race-specific carbon triathlon frame. But the rear end is slightly stiffer, so it’s still a performance bike that could tackle an Ironman. $599 for the frame, fork, headset and seatpost. The fork is their Atmos model, which has carbon legs and alloy steerer. Starts as small as a 46, running up to a 60. The new Pro-Lite Antero Carbon mountain bike wheels will come in 27.5 and 29, with the latter working just fine for cyclocross, too.They use their oversized pawl mechanism to get 84 points of engagement using six 2-step pawls. That’s clicking along next to an oversize Japanese EZO bearing to handle the higher loads caused by modern oversize cogs. The carbon rim has a width of 26mm ext/21mm int and measures 23mm tall. Check the internals and rim profiles, plus more new stuff, below… Note the massive diameter of the sealed cartridge bearing just behind the pawls. With two engagement points per pawl, they provide about 4.2º of rotation before engaging.last_img read more

Los Alamos Police Cmdr. Oliver Morris Shares FBI National Academy Experience With Rotary Members

first_imgHe also completed the “yellow brick road”, a 6.1-mile grueling run through a hilly, wooded trail built by the Marines. Along the way, the participants must climb over walls, run through creeks, jump through simulated windows, scale rock faces with ropes, crawl under barbed wire in muddy water, maneuver across a cargo net and much more. He explained that his participation in the academy resulted from a commission in 1935 that reported a need for a national standard for police officers. A career in law enforcement was always something Morris said he aspired to do. He credited this aspiration to a deputy sheriff from his hometown. He  explained as a young kid growing up in a small farming  community in California his family didn’t have a lot of money but his mother worked to buy him a bike. By KIRSTEN LASKEYLos Alamos Daily Post [email protected] “That really stuck with me on being a police officer … I always like to share the story because it was somebody who impacted my life to want to be a police officer,” Morris said. “I think being a police officer is the best job.” During the academy, Morris traveled to New York City and visited the New York Police Department (NYPD) Police One Plaza headquarters. The academy evolved to become a global network. In fact, Morris said he met law enforcement officials from Cambodia, Kenya, Thailand, Denmark, Uganda and other countries. To sum it up, Morris, who also is a Rotarian, said, “It was a good experience.” “What was interesting was even though we might not have been well off this particular family was even less well off than us,” Morris said “I think he just had a really big heart for that family and he didn’t charge the kid, he just made it a learning experience. It was a big learning experience for me to ride over there with him and face that head on.” His class also raised $21,000 in a single night, which was donated to a cops program and the Special Olympics. Los Alamos Police Cmdr. Oliver Morris discusses his experience at the FBI National Academy. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com Los Alamos Police Cmdr. Oliver Morris discusses his experience at the FBI National Academy during a talk Tuesday at the Rotary Club of Los Alamos meeting at Cottonwood on the Greens. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com center_img “We just saw a need to have more of a net of law enforcement,” Morris said. The work, it seems, was worth it. “I’m so blessed to have this experience. I couldn’t have done without (my family),” Morris said. He added that one night those attending the academy cooked meals from their home countries. It was an opportunity, Morris said, to introduce peers to their cultures. However, his bike was stolen, which devastated him, Morris said. But, the deputy sheriff was able to track down the bike and drove Morris to the kid’s house to retrieve it. After finding them, the deputy sheriff took the kids to his own home, his wife fed and bathed them and the two children were given to child protection services the following day. To get into the academy, Morris said he applied a few years ago and was nominated to attend the academy by a FBI agent from the Albuquerque office. The application process was lengthy; Morris said his entire background was looked at. Later, Morris said he was on another ride with the deputy sheriff when a fellow deputy found a truck and a woman on methamphetamines who had abandoned her young children in that truck for more than two days. Morris said the toddlers hadn’t eaten and if it wasn’t for the deputy patrolling the highway they wouldn’t have been found. For 10 weeks Los Alamos Police Cmdr. Oliver Morris attended the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Va., and on Tuesday shared his experiences with the Rotary Club of Los Alamos. During the 10-week program, Morris took several courses, which touched on a variety of topics including body cameras, rapid DNA, emotional intelligence, wellness and vitality and communication and media relations.last_img read more

Countrywide to close branches as sales halve.

first_imgHarry Hill, chairman said that completed sales in the first half of November were running at about half the rate seen in the summer.’There is still a reasonable number of people wanting to buy a house but the net situation is being affected by a high cancellation rate,’ he said. Cancellations were greater than in the last “mini-slowdown” in late 2004 and 2005, he added.’Mr Average is just seeing this maelstrom of news going around his head, most of which isn’t very good,” he said. “Even if he goes to buy a house, he goes to the pub and half his mates say he must be mental. So he rings up and changes his mind.’Countrywide employs more than 10,000 people and owns brands such as John D Wood, Bairstow Eve, Abbotts, Gascoigne Pees and the Bradford & Bingley estate agencies.last_img read more