Microsoft affirms mobile commitment

first_imgHomeDevicesNews Microsoft affirms mobile commitment Related LumiaMicrosoftSurfaceWindows AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 27 APR 2016 Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more Previous ArticleUberMoto launches in Vietnam, kicks off price warNext ArticleApple Pay yet to offer “meaningful” revenue despite 1M adds per week Author Sony, Microsoft unveil latest joint AI playcenter_img Devices Microsoft was forced to reiterate its support for the mobile market, following continued questions about its attitude to this sector.A memo from Terry Myerson, EVP of Microsoft’s Windows and Devices group, was published by Windows Central, in which it was asserted that “it is our intention to support the Windows 10 Mobile platform for many years”.“We have a device roadmap to support that from Microsoft as well as our OEM partners, who will also be selling an expanded lineup of phone devices based on this platform,” he continued.Microsoft’s mobile efforts hardly merited a mention at the company’s recent Build developer conference, with The Verge reporting that Myerson had said that smartphones are “not the core” of the focus in the immediate future.The company’s mobile devices unit is also in freefall.The real challenge for Microsoft is that while its Windows 10 platform is gaining traction in terms of PCs and tablets, the company has no real presence in smartphones at all. This means it is not addressing the largest and most important segment of the market.This is also a challenge for its developer proposition. While the company is pushing application compatibility across devices, the lack of a significant mobile presence will deter developers primarily looking at mobile first.Microsoft is looking to address this through tools intended to enable developers to bring apps from other platforms easily, while also making its own apps and services available cross-platform to extend its reach.While Myerson’s missive does assert there will be a future for Windows 10 in the mobile market, it is notably lacking in detail. The company unveiled a Lumia device early in February, but has remained quiet since then, including at Mobile World Congress shortly after.It has been suggested that it could be the last to wear the Lumia badge.Microsoft has previously said it will focus its mobile efforts on the high-end and business markets, adopting a similar model to its Surface tablet line – which after a bumpy start has grown into a robust business.But Windows Central suggests the “Surface Phone” will not come until April next year, alongside an updated Windows 10 build. This would leave Microsoft’s mobile efforts on hiatus for a significant period of time. Tags Steve Costello Google taps retail with NYC store Microsoft, SKT set date for 5G cloud gaming launchlast_img read more

Caretaker of Stray Cats Wins Charitable Deduction Fight in Court: Helps All Animal Rescue Volunteers

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreA woman who claimed a charitable deduction for taking care of 70 stray cats won her case against the IRS, a victory for animal-rescue volunteers across the U.S. that helped clarify the treatment of unreimbursed expenses for 1.5 million IRS-recognized charities.The decision paves the way for volunteers of animal-rescue groups like the ASPCA and Humane Society of the U.S. to deduct unreimbursed expenses that further the groups’ missions, such as fostering stray animals. (READ the story in the Wall Street Journal)Thanks to Joel Arellano for submitting the story to our Facebook page!AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Casting Complete for Roy Williams’ The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner at the Atlantic Theater Company

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 9, 2014 View Comments The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner tells the story of Colin (Best), who with few prospects in life, finds himself in a prison school for criminal activity. He turns to long distance running as an escape, only to have the school exploit him for his talent, offering him a possible way out. Will he run his race for them, or for his independence? Gardiner’s New York theater credits include the Obie winning play Born Bad and the world premiere production of the Pulitzer Prize finalist Bulrusher. Williams was Olivier nominated for Sucker Punch.  The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner’s creative team features scenic design by Lauren Helpern, costume design by Bobby Frederick Tilley II, lighting design by Michael Chybowski, sound design by Bart Fasbender and projection design by Pauline Lu and Paul Piekarz. Along with Bay and Best, the cast of the stage adaptation of Alan Sillitoe’s classic story will include Zainab Jah (Ruined), Jasmine Cephas Jones, Patrick Murney (White Noise), Joshua E. Nelson, Sydney Sainté, Raviv Ullman (The King and I), Todd Weeks  (The Jammer) and Malik Yoba (Disney’s Cool Runnings). Related Shows The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner Complete casting has been announced for the American premiere of Roy Williams’ The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner off-Broadway. Directed by Leah C. Gardiner, the new production will feature Eshan Bay (Netflix’s House of Cards) and Sheldon Best (A Midsummer Night’s Dream) and begin performances on January 8, 2014. The show will play a limited engagement through February 9 at Atlantic Theater Company’s Stage 2, with opening night set for January 21.last_img read more

Caribbean influence on American Black History

first_imgAs we commemorate Black History Month, Caribbean National Weekly is taking this opportunity to present its readers with the series “Caribbean Influence on American Black History.”  We regard this series as important not only to commemorate Black History Month, but to apprise our readers of the significant impact Caribbean immigrants have made to American history, particularly in light of degrading remarks recently made regarding immigrants from a Caribbean nation and Africa.Part 1: 1650 – 1930’sHistory relates that people from the Caribbean began migrating, albeit forcibly, and in chains, to America as slaves in the 17th century. Around 1650 British slave masters took slaves from Barbados to work on plantations in South Carolina and Virginia, creating the beginnings of a formidable Caribbean community in both states. Up to 1700 virtually all the slaves in South Carolina came from Barbados. During the 18th century it was estimated that up to 20 percent of the slaves in South Carolina were from the Caribbean, and the majority of the slaves in the northern states were of Caribbean origin, with slaves in New York originating from the Caribbean outnumbering those imported directly from Africa by three to one.Along with South Carolina, Virginia and New York, a strong Caribbean community also grew in Boston, Massachusetts. In 1860 it was estimated that one of five Bostonians were born in Barbados, or elsewhere in the Caribbean.After the American Civil War ended in 1865, the foreign-born black population in the U.S, was determined to be of predominantly Caribbean origins, increasing between 1850 and 1900 from some 4,000 to over 20,000. As the Caribbean population took roots in the U.S. it started to make significant contributions from relative unheralded people like, Robert Campbell, Jamaican, assistant principal of Philadelphia’s   Institute of Colored Youth, in 1855; David Augustus Straker, Barbadian, lawyer, educationalist, journalist and civil rights proponent; Jan Earnst Matzeliger, from Surinam, inventor of a shoe making machine in the 1870’s; William Crogman, St Martins, Latin and Greek scholar, former president of Clark College and a founder of the American Negro Academy; and Joseph Atwell, Barbadian, who in 1867 was the first Blackman, after the Civil War, to be ordained in the U.S. Episcopal church. In fact, according to one historian West Indian immigrants at the turn of the nineteenth century were regarded “as paragons of intelligence and men of breeding.”At the dawning of the 20th century there was a significant increase in the migration of Caribbean nationals to America. According to historian Winston James, “The History of Caribbean Migration to the U.S.” the trend peaked in the 1920’s then slowed during the Great Depression in the 1930’s.The U.S. population of black foreigners and their descendants grew from 55,000 in 1900 to 178,300 in 1930, with the overwhelming majority coming from the Caribbean, including Cuba. Although large numbers of Bahamians settled in Florida, New York City became the primary destination, especially Manhattan and Brooklyn. Almost a quarter of the black population in Harlem was said to be of Caribbean origin and was reputed to be the largest West Indian city outside of Kinston, Jamaica.In the 1920’s Caribbean migrants were increasingly attracted to the United States by its high employment and wages, while, simultaneously, the British Caribbean (in particular) was experiencing economic hardships from the decline in the demand for sugar with competition from Cuba and Brazil.  However, the new migrants not only consisted of laborers, but a middle-class consisting of teachers, nurses and civil servants who were dissatisfied  with the low income these careers attracted in the Caribbean. This latter group who advanced their education on coming to the U.S. increased the pool of literate, skilled, white-collared and professional Caribbean-Americans. In the first three decades of the 20th century succeeding waves of Caribbean migrants entered the U.S. through New York City, significantly increasing the Caribbean-American population. Unfortunately since most of the migrants were black, not much recognition was given to a defined Caribbean population. However, notwithstanding, this resourceful and resilient population quickly gained their own identity in all spheres of American life, and especially in business politics, education, sports, entertainment and the arts. The Caribbean community, produced outstanding people like: Marcus Garvey, Claude McKay, C.L.R. James, Sidney Poitier, Julian ‘Canonball’ Adderly, and Hubert Harrison regarded as the Father of Harem Radicalism.Several historians of the Caribbean-American heritage regard the waves of Caribbean immigrants in the early twentieth century, as formulating the infrastructure of Caribbean-American life in the U.S., particularly in New York City. In the 1930’s a significant percentage of New York City’s black professionals and business-people, found mostly in Harlem, were of Caribbean origin. This wave of Caribbean immigrants fostered a Who-Is-Who in American, particularly black American, history, and includes: Malcolm X, Louis Farrakhan, Harry Belafonte, Colin Powell, Cicely Tyson, Shirley Chisholm, Constance Burke Motley, Kareem Abdul Jahbar,  Patrick Ewing, Tim Duncan, Yaphet Kotto, Marion Jones, Lauderdale Lakes Mayor Hazelle Rogers and US Senator Kamala Harris.Next Week: The 1930’s to 1970’s.last_img read more

UWP deputy leader calls for political debates

first_imgUWP’s Deputy Political Leader, Claudius SanfordDeputy leady of the United Workers Party Claudius Sanford has called for discussion among political leaders in Dominica. Mr Sanford, who addressed the UWP’s 25th anniversary celebration in Londonderry on Sunday, 29th September, said debates among party leaders should be encouraged. “There must be debates among our leaders, are you ready for the debate? There must be an opportunity for the youth to hear their leaders and make an independent decision, it is about their life and their future, there must be conversations and we will lead the conversations”.He noted that discussion on the decriminalization of marijuana in Dominica as too many young people are being imprisoned as a result of the illegal drug.“There must be conversations such as the decriminalization of marijuana; too many of our youth go to jail while honourable get away”.He further called for discussion regarding the modification of the country’s financial system.“There must be conversation about making our academic qualification an asset, young people should be able to present to financial institutions in Dominica their academic certificate and match that with some start-up capital for small business”.He told supporters that the issue of the construction of an international airport for Dominica remains a priority for the UWP.“We in the UWP continue to place the international airport on the front burner, we in the Kalinago Territory will benefit from an international airport so we support an international airport,” Mr Sanford stated. He also promised his constituents that a UWP government will make the Kalinago Development Corporation a reality if it his successful at the polls. Dominica Vibes News Sharing is caring! Share LocalNews UWP deputy leader calls for political debates by: – September 30, 2013 Tweetcenter_img Share Share 124 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

Government to provide public gym but not manage it says PM

first_img Share Share Share LocalNewsSports Government to provide public gym but not manage it says PM by: Dominica Vibes News – May 9, 2016 Sharing is caring!center_img 1260 Views   2 comments Tweet Photo credit: www.jeromefitness.comDominicans could soon have access to a public gym. Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit, while addressing the contract signing ceremony for roof repairs to the Windsor Park Sports Stadium on Thursday 5 May 2016, said that Dominica has already received gym equipment from the government of the People’s Republic of China.“There’s a request before me for an amount of funds to retrofit the space to set up the gym that I believe I will give favourable consideration to, so very soon we will have a public gym,” he revealed. Mr. Skerrit however stated that government is not interested in managing a public gym, which is where partnership between one of the associations and the government should come in as the space will be provided rent free. “So can we have the alliance of associations responsible for managing the gym and set up a schedule for that, so that the public can have access to it? You cannot rely on the government to do everything where sports [are] concerned; we have to play our part…We will retrofit the building, it would be available, the space would be available to the public and whether an association can be prepared to manage the gym and so forth,” the Finance Minister indicated.Furthermore Mr Skerrit addressed the issue surrounding the construction of an indoor facility saying, “we have not scrapped the indoor facility, all we are saying is that there will be a delay in the implementation of it”. In May 2014, government announced that it had engaged a Florida firm to construct the facility which will cater for basketball, volleyball and netball games and that financing for the facility was secured from the government of Mexico in the amount of US five million dollars and drawings were being concluded.Mr Skerrit informed that a deliberate decision had to therefore be taken to delay the construction of the indoor sporting facility as government had to relocate and resettle several families following the passage of Tropical Storm Erika last August. In the interim Mr. Skerrit continued, “We are paying rent for all of these families who have been dislocated, we are paying income support every month…It is a huge sum of money and we had to make a deliberate decision as to what was the priority at the time.”The Ministry of Sports will continue with the designs and Mr Skerrit said “once we can see our way with respects to the resettlement of the communities with regards to the infrastructure, then I believe we would be in a position to look at the commencement of the facility…I foresee that based on how things are going we are in a position to commence construction in 2017”. In the meantime, he continued, the government continues to look into improving the Massacre playing field and basketball court. “Even if we had the indoor facility we would still need to upgrade, Massacre in particular, that has been heavily used for various court activities. So we will be looking at this and I will be hoping to put funds in the budget for the Massacre hard court; to cover it, to improve on the stands, the safety of players and spectators alike”.This he said is a major priority for the government and it will be done in the financial year 2016/2017.last_img read more

MSU’s Road Dawgs 2015 Tour consists of 10 stops

first_imgThe biggest names in Mississippi State athletics will begin traveling across the southeast on May 4 as part of the Road Dawgs 2015 Tour. The tour will consist of 10 stops beginning with Meridian.The annual fan-friendly event is a collaboration by the MSU Bulldog Club, MSU Alumni Association and local alumni chapters. Head coaches Dan Mullen, Ben Howland and Vic Schaefer, Director of Athletics Scott Stricklin and defensive coordinator Manny Diaz will be touring the region on various dates.Details on each tour stop are below. For more information, visit http://www.alumni.msstate.edu/roaddawgs.Monday, May 4: Meridian, Miss., hosted by Lauderdale County chapter Time: 6 p.m. social and buffet, 6:30 p.m. programSpeakers: Ben Howland, Manny DiazLocation: Kahlmus Auditorium on MSU-Meridian campusCost: $10 adults, free for kidsRSVP: Fred Monsour (601-693-9571 or [email protected])Thursday, May 7: Grenada, Miss., hosted by Grenada-Montgomery chapterTime: 6 p.m. social and buffet, 7 p.m. programSpeakers: Scott Stricklin, Manny DiazLocation: Perry Creek Golf Club, 2213 Country Club DriveCost: $20 adults, $10 kids (ages 12 and under)RSVP: Fran Harper (662-417-2481 or [email protected])Monday, May 11: Olive Branch, Miss., hosted by DeSoto County chapter Time: 11:30 a.m. social and buffet, 12 p.m. programSpeakers: Dan Mullen, Ben Howland, Vic Schaefer, Scott StricklinLocation: Cherokee Valley Golf Club, 6635 Crumpler Blvd.Cost: Free admissionRSVP: Michael Parker (662-895-2000) or Randy Allen (662-892-1645)Monday, May 11: Biloxi, Miss., hosted by Harrison-Stone chapter Time: 6 p.m. social and buffet, 7 p.m. programSpeakers: Dan Mullen, Ben Howland, Vic Schaefer, Scott StricklinLocation: Beau Rivage Pavilion, 875 Beach Blvd.Cost: $15 adults, $5 students (ages 11 to 18, free for kids 10 and underRSVP: Jeff Ellis (228-697-4347 or [email protected])Tuesday, May 12: Natchez, Miss., hosted by Adams-Franklin-Wilkinson chapter Time: 11:30 a.m. social and lunch, 12 p.m. programSpeakers: Dan Mullen, Ben Howland, Vic Schaefer, Scott StricklinLocation: Hotel Vue, 130 John R. Junkin DriveCost: $20 per personRSVP: Lou Ann Jordan (601-870-1011 or [email protected])Tuesday, May 12: Houston, Texas, hosted by Greater Houston chapter Time: 6 p.m. social & Hors d’oeuvres, 7 p.m. programSpeakers: Dan Mullen, Vic Schaefer, Scott StricklinLocation: Majestic Metro, 911 Preston StreetCost: $20 per person RSVP, $50 per family RSVP, $25 per person walk up, $50 per family walk upRSVP: [email protected], May 13: Birmingham, Ala., hosted by Birmingham chapter Time: 6 p.m. social and buffet, 7 p.m. programSpeakers: Dan Mullen, Vic SchaeferLocation: Hoover Country Club, 3140 Club DriveCost: $35 per person (ages 12 and older), $60 reserved seating, $10 per child (ages 11 and under)RSVP: BirminghamBulldogs.com, [email protected], May 14: Greenville, Miss., hosted by Washington County chapter Time: 6 p.m. social and buffet, 7 p.m. programSpeakers: Dan Mullen, Vic SchaeferLocation: Greenville Country Club, 2476 Hwy 1Cost: $25 per adult (age 16 or older), $15 per student (age 5 to 15), free for kids 4 and underRSVP: Bill Allen (662-379-3183) or Andy Dixon (662-332-6214) or Mary Claire Glasco (662-344-9031)Monday, May 18: Tupelo, Miss., hosted by Lee County chapter Time: 6 p.m. social and buffet, 6:30 p.m. programSpeakers: Ben Howland, Vic Schaefer, Manny Diaz, Scott StricklinLocation: Tupelo Furniture Market, Building #4, 1879 Coley RoadCost: $15 per person, $25 per couple, $5 per child (ages 12 and under)RSVP: Donna McNeece ([email protected])Tuesday, May 19: Vicksburg, Miss., hosted by Warren County chapter Time: 6 p.m. social and buffet, 6:30 p.m. programSpeakers: Manny DiazLocation: Vicksburg Convention Center, 1600 Mulberry StreetCost: $13 per personRSVP: Josh McBride ([email protected] or 601-618-8452)last_img read more

NFL acknowledges game clock error in Steelers-Chargers game

first_imgFor the second week in a row, the NFL is acknowledging an officiating error during a nationally televised game.This time, the problem was twofold: 18 seconds were incorrectly run off the clock late in the fourth quarter of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ 24-20 victory at the San Diego Chargers — and not one of the game officials noticed the gaffe and corrected it.In a statement emailed Tuesday, league spokesman Michael Signora said that “an error by the clock operator” after a touchback allowed the extra time to tick away, and “it is the responsibility of the side judge to supervise the timing of the game.”The statement added: “Had the side judge or any of the other six on-field officials noticed the timing error, they could have corrected it.”In last week’s Monday night game, an official missed a late-game call in Seattle’s 13-10 victory over Detroit, giving the Seahawks the ball even though one of their defenders knocked a fumbled ball out of the end zone, which should be a penalty.The most recent mistake happened after San Diego kicked a field goal to take a 20-17 lead with 2 minutes, 56 seconds left Monday night. The ensuing kickoff went for a touchback, so the clock never should have started. Instead, it rolled down, and by the time Pittsburgh lined up for the first play of its crucial drive, only 2:38 remained.As it turns out, the Steelers managed to make it all the way downfield in time to score the go-ahead points on the final play from scrimmage, a 1-yard TD run by Le’Veon Bell. So, not surprisingly, Pittsburgh coach Mike Tomlin’s take, essentially, was: All’s well that ends well.“It didn’t define the outcome of the game,” Tomlin said Tuesday, “so I’m moving on with my work week.”The truth is, of course, there really is no way to know how the outcome of the game could have been different had those extra 18 seconds not been “lost.” Perhaps San Diego would have been left with enough time for a play or two — or a kickoff return for a TD. Or perhaps Pittsburgh would have called things differently on offense with more room on the clock, maybe running time down to nothing, anyway.Who knows?Signora’s statement noted: “The performance of the clock operator and game officials will be reviewed per the standard procedure for reviewing every play of every game.”Each game-clock operator is hired by the league, not the home team, and lives near the stadium hosting a regular-season game. In the playoffs, the league uses operator who don’t live in the area.“We proceed with the assumption,” Tomlin said, “the clock is going to be managed properly.”___AP Sports Writer Will Graves in Pittsburgh contributed to this report.___Online:AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and AP NFL Twitter feed: www.twitter.com/AP_NFL___Follow Howard Fendrich on Twitter at http://twitter.com/HowardFendrich,For the second week in a row, the NFL is acknowledging an officiating error during a nationally televised game.This time, the problem was twofold: 18 seconds were incorrectly run off the clock late in the fourth quarter of the Pittsburgh Steelers’ 24-20 victory at the San Diego Chargers — and not one of the game officials noticed the gaffe and corrected it.In a statement emailed Tuesday, league spokesman Michael Signora said that “an error by the clock operator” after a touchback allowed the extra time to tick away, and “it is the responsibility of the side judge to supervise the timing of the game.”The statement added: “Had the side judge or any of the other six on-field officials noticed the timing error, they could have corrected it.”In last week’s Monday night game, an official missed a late-game call in Seattle’s 13-10 victory over Detroit, giving the Seahawks the ball even though one of their defenders knocked a fumbled ball out of the end zone, which should be a penalty.The most recent mistake happened after San Diego kicked a field goal to take a 20-17 lead with 2 minutes, 56 seconds left Monday night. The ensuing kickoff went for a touchback, so the clock never should have started. Instead, it rolled down, and by the time Pittsburgh lined up for the first play of its crucial drive, only 2:38 remained.As it turns out, the Steelers managed to make it all the way downfield in time to score the go-ahead points on the final play from scrimmage, a 1-yard TD run by Le’Veon Bell. So, not surprisingly, Pittsburgh coach Mike Tomlin’s take, essentially, was: All’s well that ends well.“It didn’t define the outcome of the game,” Tomlin said Tuesday, “so I’m moving on with my work week.”The truth is, of course, there really is no way to know how the outcome of the game could have been different had those extra 18 seconds not been “lost.” Perhaps San Diego would have been left with enough time for a play or two — or a kickoff return for a TD. Or perhaps Pittsburgh would have called things differently on offense with more room on the clock, maybe running time down to nothing, anyway.Who knows?Signora’s statement noted: “The performance of the clock operator and game officials will be reviewed per the standard procedure for reviewing every play of every game.”Each game-clock operator is hired by the league, not the home team, and lives near the stadium hosting a regular-season game. In the playoffs, the league uses operator who don’t live in the area.“We proceed with the assumption,” Tomlin said, “the clock is going to be managed properly.”___AP Sports Writer Will Graves in Pittsburgh contributed to this report.___Online:AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and AP NFL Twitter feed: www.twitter.com/AP_NFL___Follow Howard Fendrich on Twitter at http://twitter.com/HowardFendrich Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin celebrates defeating the San Diego Chargers in an NFL football game Monday, Oct. 12, 2015, in San Diego. The Steelers won 24-20. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)last_img read more