NCSS names Todd Bauman executive director

first_imgVermont Business Magazine On March 1, 2017, the Board of Directors of Northwestern Counseling & Support Services, Inc (NCSS) selected Todd Bauman as the agency’s next executive director. Starting in July, Bauman will follow in the footsteps of Ted Mable, who has served as the agency’s leader since 1998. Bauman was recommended to the Board of Directors by the hiring committee after a nationwide search and vigorous review of 68 applications. Bauman’s 28-year career in mental health and government—12 of which have been at NCSS as the director of Children, Youth & Family Services—has more than prepared Bauman to lead the organization.As director of Children, Youth & Family Services, Bauman oversees 280 employees providing developmental, mental health, and substance abuse supports to the people of Franklin and Grand Isle Counties. When Bauman began as director in 2005, the division employed 60 people. Bauman’s collaboration with community and state partners has allowed for the development of programs that serve children diagnosed with Autism; provide mobile outreach to children in crisis; meet the treatment needs of adolescents struggling with substance abuse; and provide home-based supports to new mothers.  In addition, Bauman has collaborated closely with area schools to develop positive behavioral supports that promote a culture of wellness. Bauman’s ability to collaborate with community partners has allowed for innovative approaches to the way families access and receive services.  Before coming to NCSS, Bauman worked as Operations Chief for five years at the Vermont Department of Mental Health. He was responsible for bringing local teams together to promote community partnerships with the goal of providing an effective children’s behavioral health service delivery system. While in this role, Bauman developed structures to assess outcomes and aggregate data across the Vermont system of care. Prior to working for the Vermont Department of Mental Health, Bauman was a crisis clinician through the Howard Center and managed a residential emergency and assessment program.Bauman’s vast clinical experience and education—he has a master’s in clinical psychology from Saint Michael’s College—is only part of what made him an ideal candidate for the role of executive director. Bauman is an experienced public speaker in a variety of settings, including academia and government; he will be a powerful and much needed voice for NCSS.Bauman is also dedicated to his family including his wife Nicole, and two teenage children, Abigail and Owen. Both children belong to regional youth dance groups; he and Nicole spend much of their free time attending their performances. Bauman also enjoys camping, skiing, baseball and spending time with parents, who recently moved to the area.Since 1958, Northwestern Counseling & Support Services, Inc, a private, non-profit, human services agency has been serving Franklin and Grand Isle Counties.  NCSS provides intervention and support to children, adolescents, and adults with emotional and behavioral problems; a mental illness diagnosis; an intellectual disability or developmental delay.Bauman is poised to lead NCSS forward in the future so that it can continue to provide high quality services that produce excellent outcomes.Source: St. Albans – NCSS March 16, 2017last_img read more

Death toll in ambulance-car bombing claimed by Taliban rises to 95 with more than 150 injured

first_img Related iStock/Thinkstock(KABUL, Afghanistan) — A powerful suicide car bomb rocked Afghanistan’s capital Saturday morning, killing at least 95 people and injuring 158, according to Wahidullah Majrooh, a spokesman for the country’s health ministry.The Taliban claimed responsibility for the insurgent attack in Kabul, which is the deadliest in the country so far this year.Police in Kabul said the explosion occurred near the entrance to the government’s former interior ministry building at the end of Chicken Street, a popular thoroughfare for shopping. The attacker was driving an ambulance, according to the Afghan interior ministry.“I was in my shop. I heard a big boom,” Haji Wali, a shopkeeper told ABC News. “I came out and helped the people wounded. There were many people wounded. People are still laying down on the footpaths close to shops.”Thick, dark smoke was seen billowing into the sky after the blast.Emergency Hospital, on the front line of trauma care in Afghanistan and run by an Italian charity, said it received at least 50 injured victims.“I helped and moved around 50 to 60 wounded people myself,” a man on the street named Parwaiz Ihsan told ABC News. “I just came back but there are many dead bodies still laying down there; we couldn’t move them.”Afghanistan’s chief executive, Abdullah Abdullah, decried the attack as “insane, inhuman, heinous and a war crime” via his official Twitter account. He also urged the international community to “take further action against state sponsored terrorism.”Abdullah tweeted, “Our priority and focus right now is to help those in need and provide the best treatment for those wounded. This is the moment when we all need to stand together and punch our enemy hard. This is enough!”U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan John Bass also condemned Saturday’s attack, describing it as a “senseless and cowardly bombing.”“My government and I stand with the brave people of Afghanistan,” Bass said in a statement. “Their work to create a peaceful, prosperous future for all the citizens of this country is the best response to terrorists and others who know only violence.” Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMaticolast_img read more