Qualcomm ramps up connectivity play ahead of MWC

first_img Previous ArticleOoredoo Kuwait group reports 75% rise in profitNext ArticleJaunt VR braves Brexit with new EU headquarters Qualcomm made a raft of announcements ahead of next week’s Mobile World Congress, including a number of connectivity-focused updates.5G NR demoThe US technology player said it had achieved its first successful 5G connection based on the New Radio (NR) work in 3GPP, which is expected to become “the global 5G standard”.It said the trial, which used Qualcomm’s sub-6GHz NR prototype system (which supports mid-band spectrum from 3.3GHz to 5.0GHz), demonstrates how the technology can be used to efficiently achieve multi-gigabit-per-second data rates with lower latency than 4G networks.Qualcomm is demonstrating its prototype system (pictured) at Mobile World Congress, as will China Mobile.In a briefing, Ben Timmons, senior director of business development for Qualcomm, said the company has “very substantial numbers of relationships with operators and infrastructure vendors all around the world where we are committed to start early trials using prototype devices – prototype devices from us, prototype infrastructure from the infrastructure vendors, working together with the operator”.“These are working against the detail of the standard as its emerging. Every time the standard changes, we are going to develop our prototypes, the infrastructure vendors will do the same, and we are working very, very closely to give the operators a really clear and easy route from what we understand now with 5G to what they will eventually launch,” he continued.Snapdragon X20 Gigabit LTEQualcomm announced its second-generation Gigabit LTE modem, called Snapdragon X20, which is currently sampling – the first commercial devices using it are expected in the first half of 2018.The company announced its first Gigabit LTE modem, Snapdragon X16, a little over a year ago, which has subsequently been used in pilots of high-speed mobile network services. It is integrated into the Snapdragon 835 processor.Qualcomm’s new chip offers speeds of 1.2Gb/s, a 20 per cent increase over the previous generation. It also supports 5x20MHz downlink carrier aggregation across licensed and unlicensed FDD and TDD radio frequencies, as well as 4×4 MIMO on up to three aggregated LTE carriers.In another first for Snapdragon modems, it also offers a dual-SIM, dual-VoLTE capability.Timmons said while the speed boost is important, the new modem brings an additional level of flexibility with regard to spectrum options.“The X20 critically brings an extra degree of flexibility that is going to allow an additional set of operators that have got more diverse spectrum to get up to a gigabit or beyond. As we are with the X16, we get some operators who look at their spectrum and say ‘that’s annoying, we can’t get a gigabit. With the X20, then they will be able to.”RF developmentsTimmons was also keen to point out Qualcomm’s work in the RF market. “RF is so important. It’s very complicated. We don’t talk about it very much. We are very good at it, and we are getting better,” he said.The company is introducing a “suite of comprehensive RF front-end solutions, making it the first mobile technology provider to develop and commercialise a comprehensive platform spanning from the digital modem to the antenna port”.“From a device manufacturer point of view, the ultimate aim is that they should be able to massively reduce the complexity on their side, of delivering multi-band mobile devices. So it means we’ll have the RF chips, the filters, the PAs, all built into a packaged-up front end that makes it much, much easier to integrate into a device,” he said.The move comes shortly after the creation of a joint venture between Qualcomm and TDK, called RF360 Holdings.Android ThingsQualcomm also said it plans to add support for Android Things on its Snapdragon 210 processors with X5 LTE modems. The company said this is expected to be the first commercial system-on-chip to offer integrated LTE support for the IoT device-oriented operating system.The package is focused at “a new class of IoT applications requiring robust, security-focused and managed connectivity”, such as electronic signage, remote video monitoring, asset tracking, payment and vending machines, and manufacturing, as well as consumer devices. 3GPP5GQualcomm Steve works across all of Mobile World Live’s channels and played a lead role in the launch and ongoing success of our apps and devices services. He has been a journalist…More Read more Author HomeMWC17 Qualcomm ramps up connectivity play ahead of MWC Tags Steve Costello AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 21 FEB 2017 last_img read more

Dutch authorities investigating possible PV module import violations

first_imgDutch authorities investigating possible PV module import violationsAn importer in the Netherlands is suspected of shipping re-labled solar modules from China to Europe via Malaysia and Taiwan. According to Dutch press reports, modules from 22 different manufacturers are being held in several European ports as part of a wider investigation. March 10, 2015 Sandra Enkhardt Legal Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share Customs officials in the Netherlands are examining solar modules at the Port of Rotterdam due to possible violations by an importer suspected of circumventing minimum prices for Chinese PV products. According to pv magazine information, minimum prices in the EU for modules from China are set to increase on April 1. Dutch customs authorities have launched an investigation into possible import violations after an importer in the Netherlands reportedly shipped solar modules from China to Europe via Malaysia and Taiwan. Investigators suspect the solar modules originated from China be re-labeled in the ports in Taiwan and Malaysia. According to information obtained by pv magazine, the modules are being held in the Port of Rotterdam for further examination. Customs authorities have seized documents as part of the investigation. It’s likely the modules would have had to pay customs duties of 65%. Authorities put the total amount for the present case at €1.2 million. Executives at REC Solar have suspected such violations against the European Union undertaking for quite some time. “It’s unbelievable that suddenly so many modules from Taiwan are being imported to Europe, especially if you look at the existing capacity there,” REC Solar Senior Vice President Luc Graré told pv magazine. Dutch trade publication Solar Magazine has reported that PV modules from 22 different manufacturers are being held in several European ports due to possible import violations as part of a wider investigation. Minimum price to rise in April The EU’s next review of minimum import prices for Chinese solar panels is on April 1. While an increase looks increasingly likely, a final decision has not been made. The review of the minimum price is based on the price development on the Bloomberg New Energy Finance module price index. The weak euro in particular could now lead to an increase in the minimum price for Chinese PV imports to Europe. The European Commission last year reduced the minimum import prices for Chinese-made crystalline solar modules from €0.56 to €0.53 per watt. PV modules from other non-Chinese manufacturers are not bound by minimum import prices in the EU.Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… 123456Share Sandra Enkhardt Sandra is Senior Editor of pv magazine Deutschland. She has been reporting on solar since 2008.More articles from Sandra Enkhardt [email protected] Related content Meyer Burger unveils 400 W heterojunction solar module Emiliano Bellini 28 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The solar module will be available in three versions – white, black, and glass-glass. 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Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… iAbout these recommendations Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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Moves to take action alongside sti… ESG criteria: Should developers take notice? Michael Fuhs 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Something is brewing in the financial world. “Sustainable finance” and the growth of ESG funds have been taking the mark… Polysilicon from Xinjiang: a balanced view pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As of March, the United States and Europe were considering sanctions on polysilicon from Xinjiang, China, due to concerns over forced labor. iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

Boffins offer primers for courtroom science

first_imgEasy-to-understand guides on scientific evidence could be introduced in courts as part of joint efforts to explore common interests between lawyers and scientists.The lord chief justice, Royal Society and Royal Society of Edinburgh have announced a joint project to develop a series of ‘primers’ on scientific topics, designed to assist judges, legal teams and juries when handling scientific evidence.The first primer will cover DNA analysis.Lord Thomas of Cwymgiedd, the lord chief justice, said the project was the ‘realisation of an idea the judiciary has been seeking to achieve’. The Royal Society and Royal Society of Edinburgh ‘will ensure scientific rigour’, he added.The primers will cover the limitations of the science, challenges associated with its application and an explanation of how the scientific area is used within the judicial system.Royal Society executive director Dr Julie Maxton said: ‘This project had its beginnings in our 2011 Brain Waves report on Neuroscience and the Law, which highlighted the lack of a forum in the UK for scientists, lawyers and judges to explore areas of mutual interest.‘We are very pleased to be building on this piece of work and playing a leading role in bringing together scientists and the judiciary throughout the UK to ensure that we get the best possible scientific guidance into the courts – rigorous, accessible science matters to the justice system and society.’Last year Supreme Court justice Lord Hughes told expert witnesses that he envisaged primers could be used in ‘modest’ matrimonial disputes, where assets such as a house or ‘modest’ ISA were ‘suitable for a single expert’.He said primers would not put expert witnesses out of work, as there would ‘always be disputed territory beyond the agreed minimum and there will always be litigants who need to go there’.last_img read more