The Social: Are you not entertained?

first_imgThe real highlights from the U.S. Presidents Cup victory come after the event had concluded, the WAGs (maybe even Tiger’s?) show up in a big way and Gary Player never ceases to amaze. All that and more in this week’s The Social. By all accounts, the Presidents Cup was a blowout from start to finish, culminating in the Americans’ seventh straight win of the event and matching the third-largest margin of victory over the Internationals. But if any fans out there stuck it out til the bitter end, they were treated to some great theatrics from the winning squad … in the media center. With the result basically wrapped up before Sunday singles began, the champagne celebration started early and it was in full swing by the time the U.S. players sat down as a team with the media – which led to some classic moments, such as Jordan Spieth and Dustin Johnson belting out their best rendition of “Si Woo, Si Woo, shaking that ass,” a reference to the song American fans used in good fun to try and rattle International team member and Presidents Cup rookie Si Woo Kim. But that wasn’t the only fun the Americans had after their 19-11 win. While in the past Phil Mickelson has seemed more-than able and willing to make headlines in winning or losing team competition news conferences, on Sunday it was the U.S. squad’s eldest statesmen who was the butt of a few jokes, despite posting a 3-0-1 record. People can debate as much as they want about the Presidents Cup’s lack-of “competiton” and what the best course of action is moving forward with an event that some say has lost its luster. But do you want to know how you know it’s still a big deal? The WAGs showed up. Big time. The annual “Take Your Significant Other to Work Week” was a great success, as usual, with all the fan-favorites showing up to cheer on their men. Paulina Gretzky. Tori Slater. Jena Sims. Allison Stokke. Annie Verrett. Jillian Wisniewski. Amy Mickelson. Ellie Day, Jessica Hadwin. Michelle Money. The list goes on and on. Presidents Cup. Playing the hits. There was one embrace in particular at Liberty National that seemed to catch people’s attention, and we’re not talking about apparent BFFs Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson hugging out the victory. No, someone else was spotted getting even cozier with Woods. Erica Herman, 33, who was once listed as the general manager of a Woods-branded pop-up restaurant at the Genesis Open, was snuggling up with Tiger all week, and while Woods neither confirmed nor denied the two were an item, they don’t exactly look like, “just friends.” Of course, if they were officially dating, we’d know. Because we would have seen an over-the-top synchronized Facebook post complete with professional photos by now. Is there anything Gary Player can’t do? The 81-year-old crushes his work-outs, does backflips off of boats and, evidently, can cut a rug. On Monday at one of his Gary Player Invitational events in New York, which raise money for underprivileged children and communities worldwide, Player found himself on the dance floor and he did not disappoint. Hey Gary, the phone is for you … It’s “Dancing with the Stars.” From Rory McIlroy to Phil Mickelson, there’s been plenty of talk about the firing and hiring of caddies this year. But there were a couple of caddie stories this week that were a little less serious in tone, which was nice considering we’re talking about a job where the main duty is literally just carrying a bag. First it was Sergio Garcia making a fan’s day month year life by letting him loop during the Wednesday pro-am of the British Masters. This particular fan, Mark Johnson, is what one might call “persistent.” This payoff came after he tweeted Garcia for 206 straight days with this particular request. The second caddie story comes from the boys behind the SB2K18 CADDIES Twitter account. They want to, you guessed it, caddie for SB2K18. The guys do make a compelling case for Rickie Fowler, Jordan Spieth, Justin Thomas and Smylie Kaufman to look over. They offer caddie races, dance-offs, sunscreen application and cocktail service. Best of luck to Willie, Juice, Hammer and Mountain. And remember, if you get turned down the first time, just ask another 205 times. That will definitely show them you’re serious and get you the job … or a restraining order. Only one way to find out. Good point. Maybe those guys will take this loss to heart and try harder to make the International Presidents Cup team in a couple years.last_img read more

Zenobi appointed conflict counsel in Miami

first_img October 15, 2011 Regular News Zenobi appointed conflict counsel in Miami Gov. Rick Scott has appointed Eugene F. Zenobi of Miami as Criminal Conflict and Civil Regional Counsel for the region of the Third District Court of Appeal.“Eugene’s distinguished 40-year legal career has provided him with the knowledge and experience to lead defense lawyers and to achieve a high level of practice in the Office of Criminal Conflict and Civil Regional Counsel,” said Gov. Scott. “I am confident he will continue to set a good example of humility and fairness.”A sole practitioner since 1980, Zenobi has served as a contract attorney for the Criminal Conflict and Civil Regional Counsel for region of the Third District Court of Appeal since 2008. Previously, he practiced with the Office of the Public Defender for Miami-Dade County from 1976 to 1980. From 1970 to 1976, he practiced with Central Pennsylvania Legal Services. He received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Scranton and a law degree from the University of Miami.Zenobi succeeds Joseph P. George, Jr., and is appointed for a term beginning October 4, and ending July 1, 2015. The appointment is subject to confirmation by the Florida Senate. Zenobi appointed conflict counsel in Miamilast_img read more

Study finds magic mushrooms may ‘reset’ the brains of depressed patients

first_imgPinterest Share on Twitter Patients taking psilocybin to treat depression show reduced symptoms weeks after treatment following a ‘reset’ of their brain activity.The findings come from a study in which researchers from Imperial College London used psilocybin – the psychoactive compound that occurs naturally in magic mushrooms – to treat a small number of patients with depression in whom conventional treatment had failed.In a paper, published today in the journal Scientific Reports, the researchers describe patient-reported benefits lasting up to five weeks after treatment, and believe the psychedelic compound may effectively reset the activity of key brain circuits known to play a role in depression. Email Share on Facebookcenter_img Share Comparison of images of patients’ brains before and one day after they received the drug treatment revealed changes in brain activity that were associated with marked and lasting reductions in depressive symptoms.The authors note that while the initial results of the experimental therapy are exciting, they are limited by the small sample size as well as the absence of a control group – such as a placebo group – to directly contrast with the patients.Dr Robin Carhart-Harris, Head of Psychedelic Research at Imperial, who led the study, said: “We have shown for the first time clear changes in brain activity in depressed people treated with psilocybin after failing to respond to conventional treatments.“Several of our patients described feeling ‘reset’ after the treatment and often used computer analogies. For example, one said he felt like his brain had been ‘defragged’ like a computer hard drive, and another said he felt ‘rebooted’. Psilocybin may be giving these individuals the temporary ‘kick start’ they need to break out of their depressive states and these imaging results do tentatively support a ‘reset’ analogy. Similar brain effects to these have been seen with electroconvulsive therapy.”Over the last decade or so, a number of clinical trials have been conducted into the safety and effectiveness of psychedelics in patients with conditions such as depression and addictions, yielding promising results.In the recent Imperial trial, the first with psilocybin in depression, 20 patients with treatment-resistant form of the disorder were given two doses of psilocybin (10 mg and 25 mg), with the second dose a week after the first.Nineteen of these underwent initial brain imaging and then a second scan one day after the high dose treatment. Carhart-Harris and team used two main brain imaging methods to measure changes in blood flow and the crosstalk between brain regions, with patients reporting their depressive symptoms through completing clinical questionnaires.Immediately following treatment with psilocybin, patients reported a decrease in depressive symptoms – corresponding with anecdotal reports of an ‘after-glow’ effect characterised by improvements in mood and stress relief.Functional MRI imaging revealed reduced blood flow in areas of the brain, including the amygdala, a small, almond-shaped region of the brain known to be involved in processing emotional responses, stress and fear. They also found increased stability in another brain network, previously linked to psilocybin’s immediate effects as well as to depression itself.These findings provide a new window into what happens in the brains of people after they have ‘come down’ from a psychedelic, where an initial disintegration of brain networks during the drug ‘trip’, is followed by a re-integration afterwards.Dr Carhart-Harris explained: “Through collecting these imaging data we have been able to provide a window into the after effects of psilocybin treatment in the brains of patients with chronic depression. Based on what we know from various brain imaging studies with psychedelics, as well as taking heed of what people say about their experiences, it may be that psychedelics do indeed ‘reset’ the brain networks associated with depression, effectively enabling them to be lifted from the depressed state.The authors warn that while the initial findings are encouraging, the research is at an early stage and that patients with depression should not attempt to self-medicate, as the team provided a special therapeutic context for the drug experience and things may go awry if the extensive psychological component of the treatment is neglected. They add that future studies will include more robust designs and currently plan to test psilocybin against a leading antidepressant in a trial set to start early next year.Professor David Nutt, Edmond J. Safra Professor of Neuropsychopharmacology and director of the Neuropsychopharmacology Unit in the Division of Brain Sciences, and senior author of the paper, added: “Larger studies are needed to see if this positive effect can be reproduced in more patients. But these initial findings are exciting and provide another treatment avenue to explore.” LinkedInlast_img read more